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Discussion Starter #1
well, im merely a whitebelt in "Sansei Goju-Ryu Karate-Do" I was wondering what kind of relationship yall have with your sensais? I regularly party with mine. My head sensei is the top sensei in my state, and I have personally had a few drinks with the Hanchi in my art...the kinda regional director. I'll be meeting and probably drinking with the top guy in my art in July...Does anyone else have this kind of experience with their art?
 

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I just came back from a party thrown by a guy in my Kumdo club. The host wouldn't let me drink, (I'm too young), but everybody was there. They were drinking and joking and having a very fun time. I don't usually go to these things but it was funny because everybody seemed so intimate. You couldn't have walked in the room and told me who the masters were.
 

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not exactly, but from what I can see is that in your MA school ppl drink more than in otheres MA schools ;)
 

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Moo.
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Define "your art?" I've been learning a variety of martial arts for many years now, and am still a student (and in some cases a teacher) in them. I believe that during classes, a relationship of respect must be retained. While I don't object to having a party or enjoying myself with other practitioners and teachers, I usually prefer to keep it professional. But, martial arts is not really something I "love" to do, it's more like a hobby for me. I do it to keep in shape and relax, as well as think and learn to appreciate life.
 

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lol... Talbain AFAIK everyone love their hobbys ;) aspecialy such hobby as MA, where you have to put your body and your soul to understand it and get experience... no offence but that's probably why you changed your teachers so often (yeah I know the more styles you know than you can be more efective in fight... that's probably anothere reason) :)
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
Well, yeah when im in training it is very professional with the typical teacher student relationship. When we are expecting to meet with folks that are of the highest ranks in our art, we are expected to follow some rules of respect...like always filling the mugs of your teachers and masters first, let them start eating first, let them sit first...

Uh, well, in Sansei Goju-Ryu Karate I cant recall the definition of "sansei" but "Goju" means "Hard-Soft" and "ryu" means "school".

In the training that I have recieved thus far, there is a mixture ways to block or deal with an incoming attack. The "hard" techniques are to use some kind of strike to deflect the attack and send it in another direction. Using a "soft" technique would consist of using the opponents kinetic energy against him/her. The soft part of it pulls a lot of techniques from aikido and judo/jiu jitsu to further mangle the opponent. (IMO the soft stuff looks a lot like something out of tai chi as well.)

More questions?
 

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Moo.
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I don't really love my hobbies. I love my work instead. Your work should be something you love in my opinion, and hobbies should things you do to fill the time, casual enjoyment. Basically, I find that my two passions, music and video games, have led me to become a composer and a performer.

As the saying goes, "If you don't love what you're doing, why are you doing it?" Of course, that isn't to say that you won't do things you don't enjoy, as I do stuff I hate all the time, but it's towards a bigger picture. X leads to Y leads to Z. I feel philosophical right now. :p
 

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I must say when you see a master in a dojo and doing very fancy footwork and using weopons at the same time it is amazing,i once saw tis master at his taichi training class and was amazed by how he had total control in the air and being able to use a spear.I wouldn't mind getting to learn martial arts as it is good for your body and soul:).Are most advanced techniques taught a little early on as a demonstration or do they wait a while to show you?
 

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Who is that Sansai ? That's Sensei for you.

As for me, I am back to my Shin-ryuu karate dojo, though I still dont go there on regular basis. We are pretty much social outside club. We have parties, meetings, trips...etc from time to time,..so yeah...

Yours,
-Elly
 

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Moo.
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duke, some masters never teach the most advanced techniques. (I know a master who's kept a person at a lower level for nearly 5 years because the student was too agressive in his technique.) I've found that most of my masters let me learn as I came to understand the purpose of the techniques. To simplify, you will learn as you become more disciplined. The techniques were not originally intended for show, and what martial arts have become in most countries, particularly America, is a weakened and degraded form. Learning something to impress your friends is not only rather fruitless, it degrades the master who taught it and the technique itself.
 

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Talbain you sound like you've watched too much starwars

Here Wushu tought like a class where the higher ranking members train the lower ranking members so the sifu (master) don't heve to be in the training facility all the time
 

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man....for a moment there i thot sifu was stfu >.<

uh....now i need to post something on topic :p

to be honest, theres not much to talk about in martial arts in a forum such as this. just bear in mind that there are a lot of ppl out there that dont talk about it or let on that they know any.
 

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Moo.
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And that's an optional style choice Player-X. But I will say that those who learn in schools that teach that way never master the techniques. It's quickly apparent to anyone who spars with them.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
well, for me the name of the system is "Sansei..." and that is separate from "Sensei" the term for teacher.

one thing I've found visiting other dojos and hearing things about other schools of martial arts (it may be dependent upon the senseis that teach it though) is that some of them are basically farms for them to make money. I hear about the tests that some have to go through and compare them to what I've been an uke for in my group and I'm unimpressed with what others have to do to move up the ranks. I was an uke (uh kinda the poor batard that techniques were done on in a belt test) for a yellow belt test and was thoroughly terrified. It was about 5-6 hours long and the senseis were brutal to the guy...admittantly he goofed up a bit and got nervous but they ****ed him up. My senseis said that their Black belt tests were 15 hours long. They did about 6-8 hours of cardio workouts...basically until you have vomitted a few times...like a few miles of running a few thousand jumping jacks many push-ups...bust yo ass. Then they do katas and kumite for 8 hours. That is a goju blackbelt test. In other dojo's that I've been to you basically get your belts on a schedule rather than when the sensei's feel you're ready.

But the big difference for us is that I am taking a class at my college with these senseis and then meeting with them twice a week at their dojo in a city nearby where they bust my ass, and then I meet at a club on campus where one of the other senseis teaches/runs the club. And, while I meet at the dojo they only charge us $25 a month. There are about 8-9 people that come to the dojo regularly.
 

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thats tkd for u.

ok i just cudnt resist since its true in the majority of cases >.<

and yes, elly was being over eager, i think
 

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Discussion Starter #16
D.D. said:
thats tkd for u.

ok i just cudnt resist since its true in the majority of cases >.<

and yes, elly was being over eager, i think
well its not only tai kwon do...I visited a Shotokan Karate dojo and it was true to what I stated about farms...it is IMO based more on what the sensei does but I dont think much of that is allowed in my style...I'm going to see my regional guy (the Hanchi) again next week and if what I expect goes I will be picking him up from the airport, and will get a good three hours on the road from the airport to ask him about this stuff.
 

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Coffee Demon
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Our Shihan also happens to be a good friend of ours. Our friendship goes back to when he was helping a friend change their car breaks. The jack gave out and the front end of the car fell onto his leg. Ole DW was there for the rescue. We managed to keep the full weight of the car off of his legs till emergency folks showed up. We saved his leg, and he was able to still practice his art. We made both a friend and a teacher that same day.

Our Shidoshi is another story..Too many Dans...too much respect ;)

We currently do not have a Sensei
 

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The seeker of perfection
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The shotokan dojos are the most propense ones (along with kung fu) to become what we call Mcdojos or money farms. There is nothing against doing things on a schedule providing the individual is fully prepared. But just testing because is time to get money is wrong.
The dojos where you get your belt based on what the sensei thinks without any test are almost gone. They are not affiliated to any association since they require to do regular tests. They are independent and while this is a good idea from my point of view (you have to live the bs, ego conflicts and politics that comes packed when your dojo signs up with an association to understand this) the students will have problems getting their ranks recognized most of the time when they switch dojos which is a shame.

About the relationship with your sensei.
Personally i think the relationship with him should be they same kind of relationship you have with the rest of the people you want to engage. You don't have to treat him like a god or be a loyal doll or put him in a pedestal. They are humans like us who happened to start a martial art before us. The problem is people often forget that.

I reccomend you to visit www.karatethejapaneseway.com
There you'll find lots of karatekas with a full vision of the karate world and not narrowed opinions. You can ask what you want related with MA and you'll always get a knowledgeable answer.
 

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Kazuya Mishima said:
The shotokan dojos are the most propense ones (along with kung fu) to become what we call Mcdojos or money farms. There is nothing against doing things on a schedule providing the individual is fully prepared. But just testing because is time to get money is wrong.
The dojos where you get your belt based on what the sensei thinks without any test are almost gone. They are not affiliated to any association since they require to do regular tests. They are independent and while this is a good idea from my point of view (you have to live the bs, ego conflicts and politics that comes packed when your dojo signs up with an association to understand this) the students will have problems getting their ranks recognized most of the time when they switch dojos which is a shame.

About the relationship with your sensei.
Personally i think the relationship with him should be they same kind of relationship you have with the rest of the people you want to engage. You don't have to treat him like a god or be a loyal doll or put him in a pedestal. They are humans like us who happened to start a martial art before us. The problem is people often forget that.

I reccomend you to visit www.karatethejapaneseway.com
There you'll find lots of karatekas with a full vision of the karate world and not narrowed opinions. You can ask what you want related with MA and you'll always get a knowledgeable answer.
Indeed...We train with no belts. You are recognized by your ability and duration of training. Basically you are a black belt when you are told you are one. We suppose the belt system provides a sense of accomplishment, but we agree that the McDojos have been quite troublesome.
When we were allowed to compete in order to gain a better understanding of other arts. We would be invited to open school competitions. We had to wear white belts with a small piece of colored tape to better class you up with students of the same level (Shihans idea..no belts remember). Sometimes the Shihan would place a higher color on our newest students in order to demonstrate how the use of a colored belt system or Sash can be misused. He never shamed any schools though. He had a gift for knowing the abilities of his students, and always paired competitions fairly. It was good to have those Shiais. It helped to demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of other arts. It also broke the monotony of us beating up on each other ;)
 

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Discussion Starter #20
agreed. But in my dojo the senseis dont offer a belt test until the student has already earned it...so its kinda the same but they still like to have the stepping of skill. And, they do honor the belts that students come wearing from other schools.
 
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