Next Generation Emulation banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

· Emulation Junkie
Joined
·
847 Posts
Snake785 said:
Oh well, if I want to copy the music off a copy protected CD, I'll just rip it from a CD player that's connected to my computer via line in. With high quality cables, I can still get good quality. DRM can go to hell.

Maybe not for too much longer:

http://www.boycott-riaa.com/article/18603
 

· Emulation Junkie
Joined
·
847 Posts
Player-X said:
Sony BMG rootkit hides Warden hackers
Two stories merge in bizarre twist
TWO STORIES of the week have spectacularly merged today. Apparently hackers are using the Sony BMG rootkit cloaking system to cover up their cheating on Blizzard's World of Warcraft, by hiding from Warden.

Warden, which is designed to monitor cheating in the game was named by electronic freedom group as major spyware.

Apparently all the hackers have to do to hide from Warden is buy a Sony BMG copy protected CD.

Warden, the anti-cheating program cannot detect any files that are hidden with Sony BMG's content protection, which only requires that the hacker add the prefix "$sys$" to file names.

LMFAO....copy protection has come so far that not only are we cracking their copy protection, we are using it to crack other copy protections. They are making the industries screw each other over!!! LMFAO!!!! :lol: :lol: :lol: :lol:
 

· Emulation Junkie
Joined
·
847 Posts
Just an addition to the above post:

http://www.vnunet.com/vnunet/news/2145874/virus-writers-exploit-sony-drm

Iain Thomson and Tom Sanders, vnunet.com 10 Nov 2005
ADVERTISEMENT

Virus writers have already started to exploit Sony's controversial digital rights management software, which uses a rootkit to hide the code and ensure that the CDs are not copied.

A new Trojan, Troj/Stinx-E, has been mass-mailed to UK email addresses. The worm is a variant of what McAfee referred to as the Brepibot virus that was first discovered on April this year. BitDefender calls the new worm Backdoor IRC Snyd A and F-Secure Breplibot.B.

The new version has been altered to exploit a feature in the XCP digital rights management technology for Windows systems that comes bundled with several audio CDs from the Sony BMG record label. The software will automatically install the first time a user tries to play an infected audio CD on his computer's CD Rom drive.

In addition to digital rights manament technology, CD also installs a so-called root kit that hides files from the user and the system, including anti-virus software. Security experts have argued that it is extremely poorly engineered and that worm authors can exploit it by simply placing the characters "$sys$" in front of a file name.

The new variant of the Stinx trojan tries to do exactly that.

"Sony started off with the right intentions but did not recognise the implications of what it was doing," said Graham Cluley, senior technology consultant at Sophos.

"We've had companies calling up all day asking what to do with this. We feel sorry for the musicians; if you look on Amazon right now reviewers are telling people not to buy the album, not because of the music but because of the copy protection.

Systems that don't have the Sony rootkit installed have little to fear as their existing anti-virus software is likely to spot and smother the threat. Sony has shipped about 2 million audio CDs with the XCP technology. There is no data to determine how many of those have been used on Windows computers, but the limited number of shipped CDs caused McAfee to rate the trojan's threat level as "low".

The rootkit in theory should help the worm to dodge detection by the virus scanning software. But the worm's authors however have made several design errors that will prevent it from causing any real harm, said anti virus provider F-Secure.

"If the Sony DRM rootkit is active (hiding) in the system during infection, the bot will not run at all. Moreover, the bot cannot survive a reboot because of a programming error," said F-Secure's Mika Pehkonen.

Sony has always maintained that its DRM technology is harmless and despite widespread criticism from the security community claims that it doesn't have any security risks associated with it. Vnunet.com was unable to reach the firm. It's media relations depertment doesn't answer the phone and the number's voicemail box has been disabled.

This worm however proves the record label wrong. "This is a very good example of why software should not use rootkit hiding techniques," said Pehkonen.

Sophos has promised to issue a tool later today which will permanently disable the Sony copy protection software and allow antivirus engines to delete the malware.

Cluley stressed that Sophos will support the technology when Sony comes up with a copy protection system that does not leave such a "massive backdoor" on users' machines.

Other companies have also reacted against the Sony DRM software. Computer Associates has blacklisted the code, which it defines as a Trojan horse, and computer experts have also been highly critical of the software.

The DRM code was developed for Sony by UK firm First 4 Internet.
 

· Emulation Junkie
Joined
·
847 Posts
If your house gets burgled, you have to delete all your music from your laptop when you get home. That's because the EULA says that your rights to any copies terminate as soon as you no longer possess the original CD.
LMFAO!!!! If somebody "burgles" my home and steal my DRM infested Sony CD and NOT my computer, there is something seriously wrong with the burglar, and my first worry would not be needing to delete those files off my harddrive!
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top