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No sir, I don't like it.
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Yes, that's normal. It may be mitigated somewhat by making some BIOS adjustments, undervolting, or water cooling. Some motherboards by default have the turbo offset voltage set above the Intel stock recommended settings. Either way, the CPU isn't going to fry itself. (unless you really crank up VCore)
 

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Crazy GFX coder
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Yes, that's normal. It may be mitigated somewhat by making some BIOS adjustments, undervolting, or water cooling. Some motherboards by default have the turbo offset voltage set above the Intel stock recommended settings. Either way, the CPU isn't going to fry itself. (unless you really crank up VCore)
Indeed! I set the CPU voltage to 1.3V tho.
 

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I ran the test and all cores were used as intended. The CPU temps raised up to 100° and the CPU throttled to 4.5Ghz and pretty much stayed there while the temps stayed around 96-101° until it ended and immediately went back to around 70°. However, it just go that high in such scenarios and not when gaming or even using the most demanding emulators with some heavy threaded tasks the CPU never reach 90° and even mid 80's are rare.

Even after such a heavy task the cpu take like 20 seconds and go back to 30° showing the work of the cooler which is really not a bad one.
I don't think it's normal to go up to 100c. Especially if you used the test I linked, since this one actually runs "cooler" than the majority of tests. Something like prime runs VERY hot, but this one is actually quite cool.
Make sure your cooler is installed tightly, it's possible it's not pushing down enough on the CPU, or verify the paste is covering it properly.
 

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No sir, I don't like it.
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Ah, here you go: Link

Gigabyte enables "Multicore Enhancement" by default. I'm assuming this automatically increases offset voltage above and beyond stock when enabled.
 

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Crazy GFX coder
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I don't think it's normal to go up to 100c. Especially if you used the test I linked, since this one actually runs "cooler" than the majority of tests. Something like prime runs VERY hot, but this one is actually quite cool.
Make sure your cooler is installed tightly, it's possible it's not pushing down enough on the CPU, or verify the paste is covering it properly.
Yep 100c is too much but as I said it only happen in such tests. I will re-check tomorrow but am sure I installed the cooler properly and is sitting quite tight but another check is probably not a bad idea. I think the cooler is not that bad but to maintain 5ghz it requires a pretty good cooler in most cases and the one I got is not bad but is definitely not the best.

I made a small test video using Cemu since you can use many cores and BoTW can be a little demanding. Am not using any type of hacks or anything just Cemu.


Ah, here you go: Link

Gigabyte enables "Multicore Enhancement" by default. I'm assuming this automatically increases offset voltage above and beyond stock when enabled.
Thanks for the Info bro! I will check it out. My world is coding so while I have hardware knowledge am quite behind in many things in that area.
 

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Yep 100c is too much but as I said it only happen in such tests.
Even if its only during a test, it's a bit abnormal. It means your computer is also running hotter than it should during every activity. I do think that what Masta mentioned is the way to go, it seems like what you're experiencing, so give it a shot! Good luck!
 

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Crazy GFX coder
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Even if its only during a test, it's a bit abnormal. It means your computer is also running hotter than it should during every activity. I do think that what Masta mentioned is the way to go, it seems like what you're experiencing, so give it a shot! Good luck!
Yup @masta.g.86 was right and that option was the problem. I find funny that is called "Enhance Multi-Core Performance" as it does more bad than good and is set to "Auto" by default. After disabling that option I never reach 90c and mostly stay at mid 80s no matter if I use Cinebench or the CPU test tool. The funny part is that while it stays at around 4.6Ghz I get over 200 more points in Cinebench and overall better performance lol!

I did some other tasks while the tools were running just to see if it locks like my old i5 did and this CPU handles things like a champion! the task manager says the CPU runs at 100% yet I can do other things and it feels like if nothing was running. Pure smoothness and extremely fast loading and boot times because of the m.2 SSD installed. So far am really happy with the new hardware.

Unbenannt.jpg
 

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Yup @masta.g.86 was right and that option was the problem. I find funny that is called "Enhance Multi-Core Performance" as it does more bad than good and is set to "Auto" by default. After disabling that option I never reach 90c and mostly stay at mid 80s no matter if I use Cinebench or the CPU test tool. The funny part is that while it stays at around 4.6Ghz I get over 200 more points in Cinebench and overall better performance lol!
While my personal preference is to keep temps below 80s, this is a huge improvements, and it seems to now be working normally. Hope you'll have fun with it! Looks quite powerful
 

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I have that option on and my temps have never reached 90 C or even close to it. 30 C idle and under load I am at 57 C with a 5ghz all cores overclock
 

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Crazy GFX coder
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While my personal preference is to keep temps below 80s, this is a huge improvements, and it seems to now be working normally. Hope you'll have fun with it! Looks quite powerful
As said none of my use ever reach that and only those testing tools actually manage to reach over 80 so am personally not worried right now. However, I may get a different cooler later on and improve the cooling but as of right now I can reach 5Ghz easily without reaching 70c in regular cases.

I have that option on and my temps have never reached 90 C or even close to it. 30 C idle and under load I am at 57 C with a 5ghz all cores overclock
57 C under normal load or using some of those testing tools??? I ask because on regular load I get those temps too. What cooler are you using btw?
 

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Crazy GFX coder
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I ran few games today but most specially battlefront 2 as that game never ran great at 4k with my old hardware. I was constantly checking the CPU temp and it was always in the mid 70s which is something I expected. However, my case was quite warm to say the least so I guess I will have to do some work later on in order to take the heat out of the case but apart from that the temps went never higher than 75c.

As the video show the game now run and looks fantastic with the new hardware at 4K.


I also checked the cooler installation and everything was fine. I also tested an AIO cooler I have here and the Artic Freezer outperforms the AIO by a huge margin.
 

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As said none of my use ever reach that and only those testing tools actually manage to reach over 80 so am personally not worried right now. However, I may get a different cooler later on and improve the cooling but as of right now I can reach 5Ghz easily without reaching 70c in regular cases.
The reason I still find it slightly worrisome is that you still had cores reaching 86, 88 and 89c at the beginning of the first loop. Typically this means over 90c later during the test. This is also a very low-temps test, other tests will typically draw even more heat, so I'm worried you might reach 95c with something worse.
The temperature you get during normal usage is obviously the #1 priority, but those tests make me believe your CPU is running warmer than it should. Finding a way to reduce the temperature will typically also lead to your CPU running faster.
I would ask you to run the "intel burn test" but I'm genuinely afraid at the result.

I don't have a 9900k, but if you ever look for a different cooler (just in case, since you asked yelo), I can vouch for the Noctua NHD15. It worked great for me! I'm using a different CPU so the comparison won't be great, but after running 2 entire loops of the easier stress test, my temperature didn't go over 75c. (room temperature is 20c, for reference)

Since your cooler seems to be properly installed, it could be airflow, like you seem to believe. Maybe your case just doesn't move enough air.
 

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No sir, I don't like it.
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From what I understand, Multicore Enhancement is supposed to help with small but very CPU-intensive tasks, automatically OCing so these little tasks finish faster. Different board manufacturers implement this feature in various ways and sometimes call it by different names. It seems Gigabyte's implementation is way too aggressive.

As a side note, undervolting has become quite popular as a result of how turbo works on Sandy Bridge and newer Intel CPUs. Since the CPU biases temps above speeds, you can manually increase your maximum turbo clocks and keep them there for longer periods of time so long as temps are good, which is what undervolting attemps to do.
 

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Crazy GFX coder
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The reason I still find it slightly worrisome is that you still had cores reaching 86, 88 and 89c at the beginning of the first loop. Typically this means over 90c later during the test. This is also a very low-temps test, other tests will typically draw even more heat, so I'm worried you might reach 95c with something worse.
The temperature you get during normal usage is obviously the #1 priority, but those tests make me believe your CPU is running warmer than it should. Finding a way to reduce the temperature will typically also lead to your CPU running faster.
I would ask you to run the "intel burn test" but I'm genuinely afraid at the result.

I don't have a 9900k, but if you ever look for a different cooler (just in case, since you asked yelo), I can vouch for the Noctua NHD15. It worked great for me! I'm using a different CPU so the comparison won't be great, but after running 2 entire loops of the easier stress test, my temperature didn't go over 75c. (room temperature is 20c, for reference)

Since your cooler seems to be properly installed, it could be airflow, like you seem to believe. Maybe your case just doesn't move enough air.
Its actually the case the reason for the heat since I use my old midi-tower that isn't really good at getting the heat out. However, since my last post I have made a lot of testing and changes to improve that. For instance this morning while playing Battlefront 2 my case got very warm making me worry which is why I made the changes.

I removed the cooler, cleaned the paste and added a extra fan to the case to get the heat out. As a result I now sit at 4.8Ghz stable and my case never got warm again even after some intense gaming today with Battlefront and emulators such as RPCS3. Temps stayed below 70c in all cases and lots of times if not most in the 60s. As I can notice during load the fans make a great job taking the warm air out of the case asap.

I will improve that later but for now I highly doubt I will ever reach over 75c again and if I do I already set a warning just in case. The only time I seem to reach over 85c is when a application or game use all cores creating an insane amount of heat. In such case I would just downclock the cpu to 4.5 to make sure I don't even get close to that any more.

From what I understand, Multicore Enhancement is supposed to help with small but very CPU-intensive tasks, automatically OCing so these little tasks finish faster. Different board manufacturers implement this feature in various ways and sometimes call it by different names. It seems Gigabyte's implementation is way too aggressive.

As a side note, undervolting has become quite popular as a result of how turbo works on Sandy Bridge and newer Intel CPUs. Since the CPU biases temps above speeds, you can manually increase your maximum turbo clocks and keep them there for longer periods of time so long as temps are good, which is what undervolting attemps to do.
Yeah, it seems like Gigabyte's implementation is pretty aggressive and not great for my case.
 

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Its actually the case the reason for the heat since I use my old midi-tower that isn't really good at getting the heat out. However, since my last post I have made a lot of testing and changes to improve that. For instance this morning while playing Battlefront 2 my case got very warm making me worry which is why I made the changes.

I removed the cooler, cleaned the paste and added a extra fan to the case to get the heat out. As a result I now sit at 4.8Ghz stable and my case never got warm again even after some intense gaming today with Battlefront and emulators such as RPCS3. Temps stayed below 70c in all cases and lots of times if not most in the 60s. As I can notice during load the fans make a great job taking the warm air out of the case asap.

I will improve that later but for now I highly doubt I will ever reach over 75c again and if I do I already set a warning just in case. The only time I seem to reach over 85c is when a application or game use all cores creating an insane amount of heat. In such case I would just downclock the cpu to 4.5 to make sure I don't even get close to that any more.
That sounds good to go, you probably won't need to downclock the CPU if it's cool enough, you should be able to let it downclock itself if needed.

You can also try what Masta said and undervolt the CPU. It's actually one way in which people recommended to "overclock" my 2700x. Since the CPU does a good job of overclocking itself, instead of trying to overclock it, we're told to lower the voltage to reduce the temperature, and in return the CPU runs faster (since temps are low). It's about finding a balance between lower voltage (for lower temps and more speed) and stability (not so low voltage the computer starts locking up).

I don't know how they do it with the 9900k, but Masta and other people should be able to help you. It would definitely help lower temps a bit and keep everything even safer. Still, you seem to be good to go now!
 

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Crazy GFX coder
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That sounds good to go, you probably won't need to downclock the CPU if it's cool enough, you should be able to let it downclock itself if needed.

You can also try what Masta said and undervolt the CPU. It's actually one way in which people recommended to "overclock" my 2700x. Since the CPU does a good job of overclocking itself, instead of trying to overclock it, we're told to lower the voltage to reduce the temperature, and in return the CPU runs faster (since temps are low). It's about finding a balance between lower voltage (for lower temps and more speed) and stability (not so low voltage the computer starts locking up).

I don't know how they do it with the 9900k, but Masta and other people should be able to help you. It would definitely help lower temps a bit and keep everything even safer. Still, you seem to be good to go now!
Am actually not that interested in overclocking the CPU and the reason I try now is because I like to test out the possibilities. As it stands right now to improve things I need a new case and probably a Noctua cooler if I want to go all in. So far the CPU eats everything I throw at it for breakfast and even PS3 games all of sudden run at full speeds as well as other games I had troubles with running at 4K with constant framerates while staying in the mid 60s.

I also tried underclocking the CPU but that doesn't work in my case because the CPU simply needs more in order to stay stable.
 

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Am actually not that interested in overclocking the CPU and the reason I try now is because I like to test out the possibilities. As it stands right now to improve things I need a new case and probably a Noctua cooler if I want to go all in. So far the CPU eats everything I throw at it for breakfast and even PS3 games all of sudden run at full speeds as well as other games I had troubles with running at 4K with constant framerates while staying in the mid 60s.

I also tried underclocking the CPU but that doesn't work in my case because the CPU simply needs more in order to stay stable.
Undervolting isn't quite about overclocking. Some people will increase the voltage and the speed to overclock, but in some cases you can leave the speed untouched and decrease the voltage to lower temperature.
Since new CPUs like having low temps - and will run themselves harder when they see the temperatures are low - it can also make your computer run slightly better as a sideeffect. The idea is that the voltage is typically (by default) higher than it needs to be. Just how much higher it really is depends on how lucky you were with your specific 9900k.

With my 2700x, instead of manually increasing the voltage and the speed of the CPU, I think I instead gave it an offset of something like -50mv or somesuch, and saw the temperature drop, and as a result my speed went slightly higher. It is important to run tests to make sure the computer is still fully stable after doing this.

It's just one way to make your computer run cooler without making huge changes. If you feel safe with the current temperatures, it's not necessary, it's just a neat change to make.
 

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Crazy GFX coder
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Undervolting isn't quite about overclocking. Some people will increase the voltage and the speed to overclock, but in some cases you can leave the speed untouched and decrease the voltage to lower temperature.
Since new CPUs like having low temps - and will run themselves harder when they see the temperatures are low - it can also make your computer run slightly better as a sideeffect. The idea is that the voltage is typically (by default) higher than it needs to be. Just how much higher it really is depends on how lucky you were with your specific 9900k.

With my 2700x, instead of manually increasing the voltage and the speed of the CPU, I think I instead gave it an offset of something like -50mv or somesuch, and saw the temperature drop, and as a result my speed went slightly higher. It is important to run tests to make sure the computer is still fully stable after doing this.

It's just one way to make your computer run cooler without making huge changes. If you feel safe with the current temperatures, it's not necessary, it's just a neat change to make.
Yeah, I have been doing some tests for few hours now by doing some changes here and there just to find the best performance while having good temps. So far the one I have right now seems to work best for me and in all tests is doing great at 4.8Ghz. I will also keep doing more tests in the next few days as you guys suggested and see how far I can go to improve things here.

Apart from that am having a blast testing games and emulators but the one that impressed me most is the PS3 emulation as my old CPU struggled with many games. Right now am running those at 4K and my CPU just run them like a champion. I may go back and do some coding at home and revive my old project just to have fun with my games and keept them organized.

For instance it was a joy to play Soul Calibur IV a game I had tons of fun with in the past and seeing it look and run that great is fantastic.

 

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Aim 4 the stars...
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My friends brought NES and SNES mini to work, we had a blast with them. They are quite pricey though, so I went with a cheaper solution for myself.

View attachment 201071

I know of its disadvantages, but once hacked and swapping PCSX ReARMed to Retroarch it becomes one of the greatest things ever :)
Nostalgia overload. brb.
 
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