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The Vodka Theme
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, i want to try out a linux. since i don't really know anything about it i would like you to recommend me user friendly one. i would also like a light one because i only have 256 mb ram :emb: and windows stucks.. alot.

i don't really play games so that not gonna be an issue for me.
 

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Well, I've been using Linux for quite some time now, and I really think that Ubuntu is a good choice for unexperienced users. It was the first distro I really liked, and it is very friendly. It is very light, so don't worry about having 256MB ram. Also, they have a very good support in their site. Whenever I had any problem, I would just visit their website, and the answer would be ready in the FAQ or in the forums. And the installation went smoothly. No problems at all.

Later I decided to try a more complex distro, and I chose Slackware. I don't regret at all, it's excellent. But for sure it is not appropriate for unexperienced users.
 

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Quad Core FTW!!!
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ArchIBaLD said:
thanks for the advice! :)

btw.. did you have any issues with the internet after installing Ubuntu?
and do any issues come up if i install it on drive D: when my windows is on drive C: for example?
The thing about Ubuntu, is that it doesn't come with alot of 3rd party software, so youll be spending some time downloading software from the net. But Ubuntu (or if you like KDE - Kubuntu) is great.

I hear Fedora Core 4 is very friendly, in fact some experienced Linux users are mad b/c of Fedora, since it's so easy for new linux people to use.
 

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If you're still looking for reccomendations, I'd go with Mandriva (AKA Mandrake).
 

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Okama Way!
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Was thinking of trying linux again soon too, now that I have a spare computer. Last time I tried though, it was with SUSE dual-boot with Windows XP, it buggered my partition table, the fix seemed simple but I couldn't get it to work =/

IIRC it was an issue with that version of the linux kernel or something? Was that ever fixed?
 

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ArchIBaLD said:
thanks for the advice! :)

btw.. did you have any issues with the internet after installing Ubuntu?
and do any issues come up if i install it on drive D: when my windows is on drive C: for example?
Actually, I had a small problem with my modem, but it was because it is a horrible ADSL USB modem (Speedtouch). I managed to install it properly, but it gave me a small headache (but it would happen to all distros). But after some time, I changed modem to a "normal" one, based on Ethernet card, and it installed quickly and easily. No troubles at all.

About issues coming up when installing on different drives, there was no problem at all for me. I did exactly the same as you (Windows in one harddisk and Linux in another one). The installation wizard partitioned and formatted everything correctly, and in the end it configured GRUB for me (a dual boot manager, works like a charm).


About what Master Chief said (Ubuntu not having a lot of 3rd party software installed), I don't think it is particulary true. Of course, some programs had to be installed manually, but overall the package was quite complete (it even included OpenOffice, which many distros don't have). Btw, installing software in Ubuntu is damn easy. Since it's based on Debian, you can use the apt-get command, that manages all packages for you. It checks for updates, and also check for library dependencies before installing something. And if you don't like command line apt-get, it includes Synaptic, a great graphical frontend for apt-get. Of course, after getting more experience, you will notice that compiling your own programs is much better for customization (you can specify the compilation flags, etc). But for starters, synaptic is the best.
 

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The Vodka Theme
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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
well i have two questions. 1) if i'm going to install ubuntu on a different drive will i have to install the driver for my modem (surfboard)? 2) i found an instruction that should make my interent work:

sudo pppoeconf

can take care of the problem if my internet wont work?
 

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Quad Core FTW!!!
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Well I'll rephrase my statement. Ubuntu comes with what is nessecary. Other distros bloat up on 3rd part software that linux n00bs (like me) have no use for right away.

Gentoo for a new linux user? oO
Disregard Gentoo, unless your up for the challenge. In my opinion, it would not be my first choice. Slackware can be mean to. Go with Ubuntu or Fedora - you won't be disappointed. Then as you become more experienced, you can move onto Gentoo or Slackware.
 

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I understand that you are a newbie, but why not go for it, why not get the best you can get for yourself? You think windows sucks so go out there and get the best distro you find, its not worth to limit yourself just because you might not know alot about GNU/Linux. As I said before I recommend Gentoo, go to gentoo.org print out the Documentation and get the live cd, read through it, run the CD and stick with the install, it will be a good learning experience about your pc and GNU/Linux, and the revard is immence. You wont regret it. :thumb:

EDIT: Master chief, your sig says your OS is Windows XP oO ??
 

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Quad Core FTW!!!
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zen_master said:
EDIT: Master chief, your sig says your OS is Windows XP oO ??
Yeah but i have a linux file server, i took it out of the sig b/c it is in storage. Also, sometimes i boot up a Knoppix live CD.

zen is right about trying any distro you want, just keep in mind this - i wasted at least 12 CDs on Linuxes. Choose wisely, dont waste your CDs. Go get your hands wet with Gentoo :thumb: . Just get ready to PIECE your own excitement together if you catch my drift.
 

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Classic Games Lover
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Archlyn said:
For a total newbie?
Well, I began with Slackware myself and didn't encounter any problems. Gentoo and Debian aren't that complicated either. In fact I never liked those commercial distros, like RedHad/Fedora, Mandrake and such. Total newbie may try some LiveCD Linux before starting a real adventure with this OS, but once you're familiar with it, the distro doesn't matter. I think it's rather a matter of one's own preferences. My fav distro is Slackware for example :D
 

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I've been using linux for a few years now and I can say it has it's merrits, but it does have it share of fustrations. But it's by going through these fustrations that make you either like linux or hate it.

What really seperates distros is the ease at which you can install software and honestly this is what pisses me off about linux.

The linux software you floating around the net in (binary form) typically don't have their libraries statically linked (they don't have the required libraries you need compiled in). So this usually means you to have to searching for the specific libraries and this is a major source of headaches. Sometimes you might have libraries installed but they are located in a different location, or worse yet the software may require an older version of the library!

Fortunately, most linux distros solve this by using a some form of package managemnt, which handles dependency issues and installs the software for you.

Here is how I would rate the package management systems most notable distros I've used:

Fedora/ Redhat - Uses yum for package management. Will only updates the core system software that ships with the distro. The libraries are kept up to date, but utterly useless for installing RPMs (basically Redhat Distro compliant binaries) you find on the net. btw attempting to install an RPM you find off the net is an exercise in futility. If a tarball exists compile from that. Fedora is still a very good distro, but it's inept package management system would make it difficult for me to recommend it to beginners.

Debian based - (Debian, Ubuntu, Linspire, etc) use Atp-get for package mangement and software installation. most debian based distros come with the Synaptic GUI frontend which makes it extremely easy to search and install software. For instance if you wanted to install mplayer you would simply search for it using the GUI and it will install the software and the required dependencies. This is really good for beginners, because it cuts down on the amount of fustration they would other wise get with RPMs.

Source Based - Gentoo, I'm singling out gentoo because Portage is simply awesome! Like debian the software repository is huge, but everything is compiled from source. Gentoo is definately they way to go if you have been using linux for over a year or two. Also the gentoo forums and gentoo-wiki are a really good sources for linux documentation. If you are the type of person who likes to tweak and tinker with stuff Gentoo is good but you really have to have alot of patience.
 

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@Hyuga. I went into Linux cold. I didn't even know how to execute commands properly. I'm GLAD I started with Mandrake. Had I not I would probably be one of those clueless Windows fanboys who accuse Linux'ers of being zealots and bash windows for no reason.

I am glad that YOU were able to start with something like Gentoo. I could never have pulled it off unless I learned a little first. My hat off to you :)

@ Original poster:
I hope you take what I'm saying for what it is. Advice. You needn't listen to me. If you feel you're up to the challenge, by all means try Gentoo! I use it now and it's very good.

And in case anyone wonders: my trek through Linux has been (roughly) these three stages:

Mandrake -> Slackware -> Gentoo

I've piddled around with other distros but never longer than a week or so, I usually go back to Slackware or Gentoo.
 

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The Vodka Theme
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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
thanks for the advice everyone!
but i still would like those questions answered:
1) if i'm going to install ubuntu on a different drive will i have to install the driver for my modem (surfboard)?

2) i found an instruction that should make my interent work:

sudo pppoeconf

can take care of the problem if my internet wont work?
 
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