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Opensource-spice
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It's the first of the morning, cold as hell. I start my PC up; it boots fine and gives me my boot menu; as always.

However, there's something else here, an odd grinding noise, when I push the back of the case in where the back fan is, it stops a little. Then as if mystically ordered by a god; it stops gradually and then goes away.

Is this heat expanding the case or warping the fan? I'm trying to understand what's going on here. There's no cables touching any of the fans. I've checked that a good four times now, and made sure that never happens.

So wierd; it never happened before I upgraded. o_O
Why now? My ram has nothing to do with a fan making that much noise. Maybe it is something else.

All in all, I'm not entirely sure it is the fan, because the noise doesn't completely stop after I push the fan guard in. It sounds like a grinding noise; a clanky : *baseball card on a bicycle wheel* sound.
 

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Its the bearings in your fan losing their oil.

Dismantle your system, and take the cover off your psu.
unscrew the psu fan, then remove the small cap in the center of the front (might be covered with a sticker.

Apply some sewing machine, or olive oil (either works), replace the cap and sticker, screw the fan back in (wipe up any oil that dripped, so... is best do to this with the fan on the outside of the psu chassis,... so hopefully the wire reaches. anyway... put it all back together, and the fan should run good as new again.
 

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Squal I hope to god you were kidding.

It sounds like something stuck in or near the fan.
 

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of course not, its a common issue with sleave bearing fans.
 

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I was not referring to that.

I meant to open a Psu and rewire a fan. Thats nuts.

Most psu's have ball bearing fans. No grease needed.
 

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and where did i say that. (read carefully before quoting)
 

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Dismantle your system, and take the cover off your psu.
unscrew the psu fan, then remove the small cap in the center of the front (might be covered with a sticker.

Apply some sewing machine, or olive oil (either works), replace the cap and sticker, screw the fan back in (wipe up any oil that dripped, so... is best do to this with the fan on the outside of the psu chassis,... so hopefully the wire reaches. anyway... put it all back together, and the fan should run good as new again.


Power Supplies - Current Solutions, Inc. - Your OEM Power Source Allies

:p
 

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I was not referring to that.

I meant to open a Psu and rewire a fan. Thats nuts.

Most psu's have ball bearing fans. No grease needed.

even ball bearings require lube in order not to seize., besides, you say that under the premise that its a quality psu......
 

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Not for at least 5 years or so though. I pretty sure Interverse wouldn't cheap out on his psu.....at least i hope :p
 

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i said hopefully the wire reaches, i didn't say cut it and rewire it.
if it doesn't he just has to be more careful in not spilling the oil.
 

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If the sound goes away after the computer warms up, then it sounds to me like this is a matter of plain old-fashioned case resonance.

It's a trivial matter; my computer does it too. The side panel is a bit loose, so if the computer is at just the right temperature the rotations of the fan (which are now slower due to the low temperature) resonate with it and produce a really loud (and annoying) buzzing sound. Once the computer warms up and the panel expands and the fans speed up a bit, the buzzing stops.

Don't worry, it's completely harmless :)

Here's a pretty cheap solution: Take a piece of tissue paper and fold it a couple of times, then wedge it between the loose area of the panel. In my case, I had to put it underneath the front corner such that the computer's weight is on it, pushing the panel up and keeping it snug. Just make sure you don't put it near fans or anything.
 

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errr. no mako, sorry, but no. Case resonance would be a constant, and have nothing to do with how long the fans are on. All you've done is change the balance on the case. which is also known to fix dry bearings.
 

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mako, it's the fan's frequency, known as resonance.
The same reason why Tacoma Bridge falls xD~
Change to a larger fan on the same speed or put on more fan at that speed, and your side panel will jump out :p
Just change the node by sticking some fixed end supports in the middle or something.
Change the mass of the side panel also helps.

The rising of frequency in electronic devices is always a disaster, hence why power plants never shut themselves out.
You are likely to pass a, or even many, resonance frequencies.
If they do, they'll encounter the same thing, but instead, the specific part, or even the plant itself might blow up if not careful.
As a result, you have to change node behaviors while raising the frequency.

I suggest you ducktape something heavy onto your side panel :p
make sure you put it in the middle, since pushing it on the edge is just to force it close, it is not really solving the resonance itself.
 

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errr. no mako, sorry, but no. Case resonance would be a constant, and have nothing to do with how long the fans are on. All you've done is change the balance on the case. which is also known to fix dry bearings.
It doesn't have anything to do with how long the fans are on (not directly anyway), but it has everything to do with:

A) The snugness of the case panels, which is influenced by the heat expansion of the case
B) The speed of the fans, which is also a function of temperature.

And, as we all know, it takes a few minutes for the computer to heat up. Once it heats up, the case becomes snug and the fans get out of sync with the case's natural frequency.

Given the right temperature, case resonance can be a bit out of control. When I come back to my dorms after a long weekend and turn my computer on in a freezing cold room it would be unbelievably loud. After a couple of minutes it becomes whisper quiet.

You'd be surprised how common this phenomenon is, especially in places where it gets pretty cold. Both Fadingz and Squall have good ideas, but they're over-complicating this issue by miles.
 

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It doesn't have anything to do with how long the fans are on (not directly anyway), but it has everything to do with:

A) The snugness of the case panels, which is influenced by the heat expansion of the case
B) The speed of the fans, which is also a function of temperature.

And, as we all know, it takes a few minutes for the computer to heat up. Once it heats up, the case becomes snug and the fans get out of sync with the case's natural frequency.

Given the right temperature, case resonance can be a bit out of control. When I come back to my dorms after a long weekend and turn my computer on in a freezing cold room it would be unbelievably loud. After a couple of minutes it becomes whisper quiet.

You'd be surprised how common this phenomenon is, especially in places where it gets pretty cold. Both Fadingz and Squall have good ideas, but they're over-complicating this issue by miles.
actually more affected by the mass of your side panel and the length between each support.
The snugness is just brupt force.
It'll eventually bend your sidepanel as fatigue builds up, if the vibration is severe.
Vibration is pretty much temperature independent, you need a temperature difference that can change the material property, not just form.
 

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you'd be surprised how many retards would believe such a phenomenom exists, however IT DOESN'T.

The vibration is caused by insufficient lubrication in the bearing well. Its happened to me on over 6 old fans, and the bearing well has been dried out. it starts off with vibration, and eventually reaches the point of not being able to even spin.

Cold weather aggravates it further.

Interverse, oil the fan.
http://www.eggheadcafe.com/software/aspnet/33470165/noise-upon-booting-comp.aspx
 

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loose up the screws a bit on your fans.
Or maybe the screws are in different tightnesses.

If your fan is always around the same speed, however, it is not likely to be frequency resonance, since it is pretty much temperature independent in the temperature fluctuation in a room.
 

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I wasn't aware that worn-out bearings were a problem with brand new fans.

Depends how long the fans were in stock/storage before reaching you.

I've seen powersupplies come out of the backroom of a shop with blown capacitors, so a fan with dry bearings isn't unlikely.

http://www.fixya.com/support/t165593-power_supply_fan_noise_cause

Anyway, the description, and fix match the tell tale signs of a dry bearing well, so yeah, top it up.

PS, anyone who buys parts from Fry's deserves faulty parts.
 
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