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AKA snkmad
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4,030 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
I just want make sure i got everything before trying.
Ill my my friends little network on his house, to share the cable modem connection. He has only 2 PC´s.
Ill buy a hud/switch. I need little advice on cables.

Ill connect the cable modem to the HUB using the cable that came with the modem right?
Them ill get 2 parallel blue network cable "CAT-5"( i dont remember the right words here, just help me out) and plug them on the HUB, right?

Now the soft part: I need to set the NIC on each PC to DHCP? WIll them be in the same network, like 192.168.X.X and mask 255.255.255.0? Or do i need additional software to make it work. Ive never worked with cable before, only ADSL.
 

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AKA snkmad
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4,030 Posts
Discussion Starter #2
Actually, after talking to a friend who used to have cable, i realized is not possible to do the way i wanted.

Here, the cable company only release net acess to those PC that match the MAC address of NIC registered on their systems. So i cannot put a HUB before the NIC card, as its MAC address thats registered on the Cable company system.

HUB´s have MAC address?? What could i do now to share internet??
 

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War Games coder
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1,926 Posts
Get a router or a second ethernet card on a machine that's always going to be on when the others want access. Probably simplest to just get a router.
 

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AKA snkmad
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4,030 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
Putting a second NIC is the easiest way, but not the best.
A router? You mean a switch?
 

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496 Posts
Buy a router. Plug the cable modem directly into the correct router part (usualy either "1" or a eithernet plug which is slightly seperate from the rest, or "up"), get as many other ethernet cables as you need, or 1 for each computer. Plug those eithernet cables into the router, then into your machines. If you buy a switch (I believe), it does something with IP addresses, and usually pisses off the cable company. If you buy a router, it allows all computers on it to be online and play games together at once, without pissing off the cable company.
Some routers need to be configured to work with internet access, espically wireless ones. Read on whatever documentation that comes with, and try to stray away from installing any software that comes with it if you can. All they've ever done for me is cause trouble. Normaly just need to plug directly into the router and connect to it. 192.168.0.1 normaly, then put in the password, which should have come with your documentation. As I said before, that's only some. Some do not require configuration, but those are normaly the ones without a built in firewall, which you should have anyway on a always on connection. Just any firewall but the windows one, haha.
- Modem
 

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2,441 Posts
you may need to do some more networking research.

if he has 2 pcs and wants an internet connection on both of them, but the cable company requires him to pay extra for more than 1 IP, he has the following options:

1) Pay the fee for the 2nd PC. This will allow you to have 2 separate WAN IPs for 2 computers. Unfortunately, you would still need to figure out how to connect the 2nd PC. Since you will need to buy extra hardware anyway, this is the worst possible option.

2) You can have the 2nd PC networked to the 1st PC and use NAT software or Internet Connection Sharing on the "gateway" pc. I have done this before and let me tell you, it is a HUGE pain in the a$$ to set up. However, if you happen to have 2 NICs/ethernet ports already in your 1st computer and a crossover/twisted pair cable, this is the cheapest option.

3) By far, the easiest way to go is to get a router. If you don't actually know what a router is, think of it as a smart switch with a built in firewall. It has 1 port that connects to the WAN, (whatever the outside world incl. the cable company sees), and generally 4 other ports due to a built in switch. The option that you would be most interested in is MAC cloning, which is standard on pretty much any router on the market. It allows you to set the MAC address on the router to any address you wish, which is usually the MAC address of the 1st PC or whatever one the cable company has on file. This will make it so that the cable company thinks you only have 1 peripheral plugged in since they will only see 1 MAC address. Therefore, you will only get 1 WAN IP but the router will allow any computer on its network use that internet connection.
 
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