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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Windows XP
512 DDR Ram
Radeon 9700 Pro
Turtle Beach Santa Cruz (Soundcard)

Plugins:
Pete's OpenGL2 2.6
Eternal SPU 1.41
ISO

Especially when high quality music files (like the songs with actually voice actors are played in FF8/9) and with music during cutscenes (FF9).

Choosing 'Lite' really doesn't seem to make a difference + it doesn't have the "update before accessing register" setting for the FF games (might be on always though).
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I think saying there is a higher pitch that occurs for a split second sometimes may be a better way to describe my problem (although I'm not sure what you mean with 'during trances').

What does the sound buffer do and what is an ideal setting? I have the default config with 64 buffer size.
 

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From Love and Limerence
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When a character trances in FFIX, there's a sound played during the scene. The very height of it is a little high pitched on mine, though it may be my sound card (I've tried 22, 32, 48, and 64 with no solution, but it's nothing too bad).

I thought higer-end machines needed a lower buffer (or is it the other way around?). Try with a setting of 22, since I always see that suggested, and try 32 if that fails.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have the default config, so that's SPUaync and Smooth. Does anyone know what the buffer size does exactly?
 

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From Love and Limerence
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emusnicker said:
I have the default config, so that's SPUaync and Smooth. Does anyone know what the buffer size does exactly?
Basically what he said. Your computer doesn't play all the sounds and sound effects just like that. The data for those sounds are stored in a temprary "buffer" before actually being played out. If that buffer is too big, the sound takes longer before it's played out, causing the sounds to be played behind the gameplay. If it's too short, the sound may be forced out of the buffer before it gets all the data needed to play it correctl.

Your CPU handles all this, so a faster CPU would require a lower number, and vice versa. I'm sure someone who knows exactly what this is can say more, but I won't get real technical. On my secondary computer (800MHz), 32 works fine, which is why I recommended you try 22.
 
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