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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok probably everyone here knows the answer on this question,but I don't so I need help from the experts.I have 2 HDD.One is in my laptop and the other one is an external USB HDD which is connected to my laptop.Both hard disk drives have the FAT32 file system.The thing I want to do is to copy my entire drive "C:" ,(which is in my laptop),to my external USB HDD "D:".For that I am using the file called "XXCOPY16.EXE" with the following
command:

xxcopy16 C:\ D:\ /c /e /h

After I press the Enter button on my keyboard,the copy process begins.But as soon as the file called "pagefile.sys" starts to copy from "C:" to "D:",it stays that way for a really long time.Ok I admit that the file is large approximately 1.0 GB.I also DO NOT get ANY errors while copying.
I can see the yellow light lighting on my external USB HDD which means that something really IS copying on it.Probably that "pagefile.sys" file.
So my question is...is it normal for MS-DOS to take so long time to copy the file which is 1 GB in size???:???:
 

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don't bother copying the page file, hiberfil or system restore folders.
 

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because they are automatically created by the operating system
 

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Why not?
Ohh by the way,the "pagefile.sys" just finished copying.:)
Pagefile.sys is the equivalent of the swap partition in linux. It is nothing more than a swap file which holds the overflow of the ram and the cache of the lesser used programs. Copying it is uselss as 5 minutes after you copied it, the data inside of it would be different. Also upon reboot it is overwritten


hiberfil.sys is the location your current ram is backed up to when you go into hibernation. It to is useless to copy (and you may not even have it, if you don't have hibernation enabled.

Also why are you using xxcopy16? why not the default command xcopy (which would probably be faster as it is 32bit and not 16 which I am assuming that file is)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Pagefile.sys is the equivalent of the swap partition in linux. It is nothing more than a swap file which holds the overflow of the ram and the cache of the lesser used programs. Copying it is uselss as 5 minutes after you copied it, the data inside of it would be different. Also upon reboot it is overwritten


hiberfil.sys is the location your current ram is backed up to when you go into hibernation. It to is useless to copy (and you may not even have it, if you don't have hibernation enabled.

Also why are you using xxcopy16? why not the default command xcopy (which would probably be faster as it is 32bit and not 16 which I am assuming that file is)
Heh because the "XCOPY.EXE" file I have doesn't contain switches for "/c" and "/h".:(
Yeah "XXCOPY16.EXE" is slow,but at least it does the job.:)
Hey by the way,is there "XXCOPY32.EXE" and what's the difference?
 

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No sir, I don't like it.
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If you're using a fully 32bit OS like Windows 2000 or newer, there is no XCOPY32.EXE. Invoking the xcopy command executes a 32bit version of xcopy.

In the older 9x branch, xcopy is the 32bit version and xcopy16 is the old DOS 6.22 version with some added switches.
 

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Heh because the "XCOPY.EXE" file I have doesn't contain switches for "/c" and "/h".:(
Yeah "XXCOPY16.EXE" is slow,but at least it does the job.:)
Hey by the way,is there "XXCOPY32.EXE" and what's the difference?
what OS are you running? as the windows 7 version (which is the same as XP and vista if I am not mistaken) contains the following switches

Code:
XCOPY source [destination] [/A | /M] [/D[:date]] [/P] [/S [/E]] [/V] [/W]
                           [/C] [/I] [/Q] [/F] [/L] [/G] [/H] [/R] [/T] [/U]
                           [/K] [/N] [/O] [/X] [/Y] [/-Y] [/Z] [/B]
                           [/EXCLUDE:file1[+file2][+file3]...]

  source       Specifies the file(s) to copy.
  destination  Specifies the location and/or name of new files.
  /A           Copies only files with the archive attribute set,
               doesn't change the attribute.
  /M           Copies only files with the archive attribute set,
               turns off the archive attribute.
  /D:m-d-y     Copies files changed on or after the specified date.
               If no date is given, copies only those files whose
               source time is newer than the destination time.
  /EXCLUDE:file1[+file2][+file3]...
               Specifies a list of files containing strings.  Each string
               should be in a separate line in the files.  When any of the
               strings match any part of the absolute path of the file to be
               copied, that file will be excluded from being copied.  For
               example, specifying a string like \obj\ or .obj will exclude
               all files underneath the directory obj or all files with the
               .obj extension respectively.
  /P           Prompts you before creating each destination file.
  /S           Copies directories and subdirectories except empty ones.
  /E           Copies directories and subdirectories, including empty ones.
               Same as /S /E. May be used to modify /T.
  /V           Verifies the size of each new file.
  /W           Prompts you to press a key before copying.
  /C           Continues copying even if errors occur.
  /I           If destination does not exist and copying more than one file,
               assumes that destination must be a directory.
  /Q           Does not display file names while copying.
  /F           Displays full source and destination file names while copying.
  /L           Displays files that would be copied.
  /G           Allows the copying of encrypted files to destination that does
               not support encryption.
  /H           Copies hidden and system files also.
  /R           Overwrites read-only files.
  /T           Creates directory structure, but does not copy files. Does not
               include empty directories or subdirectories. /T /E includes
               empty directories and subdirectories.
  /U           Copies only files that already exist in destination.
  /K           Copies attributes. Normal Xcopy will reset read-only attribute
  /N           Copies using the generated short names.
  /O           Copies file ownership and ACL information.
  /X           Copies file audit settings (implies /O).
  /Y           Suppresses prompting to confirm you want to overwrite an
               existing destination file.
  /-Y          Causes prompting to confirm you want to overwrite an
               existing destination file.
  /Z           Copies networked files in restartable mode.
  /B           Copies the Symbolic Link itself versus the target of the link
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 · (Edited)
If you're using a fully 32bit OS like Windows 2000 or newer, there is no XCOPY32.EXE. Invoking the xcopy command executes a 32bit version of xcopy.

In the older 9x branch, xcopy is the 32bit version and xcopy16 is the old DOS 6.22 version with some added switches.
Lol not XCOPY32.EXE.I meant on XXCOPY32.EXE.I read somewhere on the internet that the XXCOPY32.EXE can be downloaded for free just like XXCOPY16.EXE only I can't find it lol.
Ohh by the way...does "XCOPY32.EXE" contains the switches for "/c","/e" and "/h"???Because "XCOPY.EXE" doesn't...at least not the one I have:(
And how much faster "XCOPY32.EXE" from "XXCOPY16.EXE" is???:rolleyes:

what OS are you running? as the windows 7 version (which is the same as XP and vista if I am not mistaken) contains the following switches

Code:
XCOPY source [destination] [/A | /M] [/D[:date]] [/P] [/S [/E]] [/V] [/W]
                           [/C] [/i] [/Q] [/F] [/L] [/G] [/H] [/R] [/T] [/u]
                           [/K] [/N] [/O] [/X] [/Y] [/-Y] [/Z] [/b]
                           [/EXCLUDE:file1[+file2][+file3]...]
 
  source       Specifies the file(s) to copy.
  destination  Specifies the location and/or name of new files.
  /A           Copies only files with the archive attribute set,
               doesn't change the attribute.
  /M           Copies only files with the archive attribute set,
               turns off the archive attribute.
  /D:m-d-y     Copies files changed on or after the specified date.
               If no date is given, copies only those files whose
               source time is newer than the destination time.
  /EXCLUDE:file1[+file2][+file3]...
               Specifies a list of files containing strings.  Each string
               should be in a separate line in the files.  When any of the
               strings match any part of the absolute path of the file to be
               copied, that file will be excluded from being copied.  For
               example, specifying a string like \obj\ or .obj will exclude
               all files underneath the directory obj or all files with the
               .obj extension respectively.
  /P           Prompts you before creating each destination file.
  /S           Copies directories and subdirectories except empty ones.
  /E           Copies directories and subdirectories, including empty ones.
               Same as /S /E. May be used to modify /T.
  /V           Verifies the size of each new file.
  /W           Prompts you to press a key before copying.
  /C           Continues copying even if errors occur.
  /I           If destination does not exist and copying more than one file,
               assumes that destination must be a directory.
  /Q           Does not display file names while copying.
  /F           Displays full source and destination file names while copying.
  /L           Displays files that would be copied.
  /G           Allows the copying of encrypted files to destination that does
               not support encryption.
  /H           Copies hidden and system files also.
  /R           Overwrites read-only files.
  /T           Creates directory structure, but does not copy files. Does not
               include empty directories or subdirectories. /T /E includes
               empty directories and subdirectories.
  /U           Copies only files that already exist in destination.
  /K           Copies attributes. Normal Xcopy will reset read-only attribute
  /N           Copies using the generated short names.
  /O           Copies file ownership and ACL information.
  /X           Copies file audit settings (implies /O).
  /Y           Suppresses prompting to confirm you want to overwrite an
               existing destination file.
  /-Y          Causes prompting to confirm you want to overwrite an
               existing destination file.
  /Z           Copies networked files in restartable mode.
  /B           Copies the Symbolic Link itself versus the target of the link
Lol why is it important what operating system am I using? I am not using the CMD if that's what you mean.I am doing this through the MS-DOS which I boot directly from the CD-ROM disc.

By the way I left my laptop copying the entire disc "C:" on my disc "D:" with the "XXCOPY16.EXE" for more then 10 hours and it's still not finished lol...so slow...
 

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dont know if anyone will take slightest bit of notice ! , but i use the dos command "robocopy" its gr8 for copying large files
get this ,lets say if you need to pause the copy ,you can just exit it and restart it when you want to go back to it.

for example

robocopy c:\example e:\example2

this is used at where i work and is even better for if your remote desking .

its also available onwinxp to win7 as far as i know and its deffo on vista.
 
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