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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I just lately installed Mandrake LE 2005 on the 20GB IDE HD in my computer. All is well except I'm unable to mount my 160GB SATA drive. I've tried...
mount -t ntfs /dev/sda /mnt/sda
but I get
mount: mount point /mnt/sda does not exist
That's the best i can come up with from the help on the mount command I've been able to find. Any suggestions?

PS. Ya, I know I probably shouldn't be using NTFS on a system with Linux. But it's able to read from the WinXP partition.
 

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War Games coder
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You'll need to compile SATA support into your kernel or as a kernel module first.

1. Before proceeding, know your system very well.

2. Install your kernel sources using rpmdrake (I assume mandrake's still using rpmdrake)

3. Using a console, go to /usr/src/linux (This is where the kernel sources went)

4. As root, type make menuconfig

5. Configure your kernel - be very thorough, don't miss anything

6. Also as root, type make && make modules_install

7. type cp arch/i386/boot/bzImage /boot/kernel-2.x.y-rz where x, y, and z are the kernel version

8. configure your boot loader to have an option to boot from there, and don't remove your current kernel in case there's a configuration issue.

9. Re-install all 3rd party kernel drivers (ATI drivers, nVidia drivers, possibly alsa (unless you compiled that directly into the kernel (requires 2.6.x)))
 

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Prepare for Descent...
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Also one thing to note when mounting is, that you need to specify which partition of that device you are mounting. So in your case an example would be:

mount -t ntfs /dev/sda1 /mnt/sda1

That will mount the first partition of that drive to the directory /mnt/sda1

To be safe with NTFS support, you should set it to read only when mounting. I'm not entirely sure how to set it with the mount command, I think you just add "ro" (without quotes) at the end of the mount command.

Now, about the error you get. I think that means you didn't create the directory for the mount point. To fix this just do:

mkdir /mnt/sda1

Then you just issue the mount command again with that path again and it should work, if you have compiled SATA support in the kernel. If not, follow KillerShots' instructions to compiling your kernel with SATA support. I hope that helps.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Ok, thanks.
I think it already has SATA support as it fully recognizes the drive in Control Center.
I'll try this as soon as I reboot into Linux :)

EDIT: It works :) ...but i'm only able to access it as root.
How do I change the permission (It doesn't let me...even as root).
 

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War Games coder
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OK, that's not too difficult :)

1. In /etc/fstab, try using this line (adapt for your own situation)

/dev/sda1 /mnt/windows ntfs umask=0,nls=iso8859-1,user,noatime,ro 0 0

The umask=0 option makes anyone using that piece the equivalent of root. As the whole file-system is read-only, this is relatively benign. nls=iso8859-1 loads up the correct code page to decode the correct character set. This is for north-america only. You may have a different code page if you're elsewhere, and you could probably get away without using this. user means that users can mount the partition. noatime is a optimization that you may get a performance boost out of. ro is read-only (best to make sure so it doesn't get the wrong idea).

As an alternative to umask=0, you may be able to replace that with owner (makes whoever mounts it own it)... you can experiment with that. I think as a side-effect, other users would find it difficult to access it while you have it mounted... you probably wouldn't care.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I have another question I'd like to ask. It's about Linux so I'll just bump this thread.

In my search for Linux programs I've come across several programs that offer multiple versions (one for Fedora, another for Debian...Slackware, etc.). Problem is that usually Mandrake isn't one of them. Seeing as I'm using Mandrake which one should I download? ...or does it really matter?
 

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Either download the source .tar.gz and ./configure and make it, or download the fedora package (I believe it's a .rpm) and use that. Really, only do the source if the .rpm doesn't work for whatever reason.
 
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