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Let's just say... you can't drag and drop just about anything to anywhere on a PC... ya? :rolleyes:

Mac just gives off this... "I'm easier to use!" feel. Not that it doesn't have customizations or anything. For instance... it is pretty easy to hook a printer or something to your Mac. It just gets recognized and works. On a PC... well... you might need to look for drivers.

But on the same note... if something doesn't get recognized by a Mac, you're about 99% screwed.

And if you're an inexperienced PC user, you'll more than likely f***s up the PC once a week on average. It's just natural. :p

On the same note, though... not like Apple doesn't screw up every now and then... and give its users hell. For instance... if your Mac is surfing the net fine, don't bother installing Safari 4 beta as there might be "problems". ;p
 

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Like a cheap hooker.
...well, I know one thing for sure: she has a limited number of accessories... :p

PCs... you can pretty much hook anything up and program it to run the way you want to. (so in the end... PC is more of a "hooker" than Mac... literally?)

I think that's the real reason - people who aren't in tune with technology in general need the hand holding of Macs.
Or that's what they want you to believe. I personally find Mac OS X still the same living hell as that of Windows or Linux when you are programming something. In fact, the only reason you might need a Mac is to program for Apple devices. Otherwise, i can't really see a difference from a developer's standpoint.

That they do. I remember the high school days of those stupid bomb pictures popping up. BSOD equivalent?
Well, Apple does have a GSOD (gray screen of death) whenever a kernel panic occurs... or whatever the hell that might just crash and burn because it can't proceed any further.

Though I gotta admit that thing appears less than BSOD. BSOD had been happening so much that I suspect the only reason you might not be seeing it is because it appeared then disappeared in milliseconds...

I remember back in Win 98... when there were BSODs that would bring you back to the desktop if you "press any button to continue".

And at least GSOD has more than one language. (more n00b-friendly?)
 

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The number one thing I gate about macs (besides their inability to run games and just about all the other software I like to use) is the huge premium you pay for inferior components...when I bought my system a Mac with a 2.4Ghz C2D and a 8600GT would have cost me more than my entire system including the extras like UPS and the TV card...a fair bit more, so much more in fact that if I had spent the same money on my PC as the price of the Mac then I would have gotten a 4870X2 instead of this GTX260.
Well, just so you know, a Mac doesn't really have "conventional" components like those in PCs... so performance varies. :p So maybe a C2D in Mac could be beefier than your average C2D depending on which model it is.

But I admit there are some common components. :)

I'm kinda under the impression that Intel supply the Xeon lines to Macs because Macs are more well-known for being workstations rather than desktop computers.

And a Mac still has games. Actually, if you don't like the game selection you get on Mac, you can do bootcamp and run Windows then. Not like it "entirely" doesn't have games at all. For instance, you can get Doom 3, Call of Duty 4, WoW, Need For Speed Carbon, or Spore for Mac. All of which run natively on a Mac. ;)

In other news, Macs may get some good boost in gaming performance soon thanks to this:

ATI Radeon HD 4870 Graphics Upgrade Kit for Mac Pro (Early 2009 or Early 2008) - Apple Store (U.S.)

Actually, beats me. It's already out. $350 a piece. :) Quite a hefty tag... but I think it's kinda worth it for Mac gaming.

Note that Mac displays can go up to 2560 x 1600... and that's quite an amount of pixels. ;p

P.S.: Admittedly... gaming on Macs work smoother than on Windows, too... in case you wonder. There's practically none of that "stutter" and "lag" and crazy errors and all those ****. It's just smooth in my opinions. Kinda like when you're playing on a console.
 

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Sure they do. There's very little in a Mac that is unique. The various components are little more than variants of the same chips sold in PCs. Even the processors are the same, except for the Macbook Air. The Air CPU uses a custom package design to fit in the small space allotted to it. It is however, still a run-of-the-mill Intel CPU. It's simply pinned differently.
Actually, Mac Mini uses a mobile socket for its CPU. :p So technically it isn't exactly what PCs are using. And yeah, they are variant, but some stuffs are different. For instance, Mac uses EFI as opposed to conventional BIOS.

Many PC chipsets still use BIOS. That's the major difference.

Of course Windows 2000 and some server variants as well as Windows Vista and possibly Windows 7 do support EFI, but only on EFI systems. Some (if not most) personal computers are still using BIOS.

That may be your opinion but it's still wrong. I think if you try to run something like Crysis on a P4 then yeah you will get what you are describing, but a decently built rig will have no problem handling typical games. To even hint otherwise shows a massive, massive ignorance on your part. And when I say "decently built rig" I mean a desktop that is 1/3 the cost of the lowest-end Mac Pro. My year old PC laptop has a video chipset that is considerably more powerful than anything a current Macbook Pro has, yet costs far less than a Macbook Pro.
Would you like to talk with Schumi about how his rig (a Core 2 Quad coupled with a GTX 260) lagged horribly in Need For Speed Underground 2 and Most Wanted? ;) He just asked about that a few days ago.

Also Crysis lags regardless. I have tried that game too many times to remember how many times it hiccups on whatever system. If the settings are above Average or Medium, it just hiccups due to various reasons.

And your laptop video chipset is a 1900XT? :p Mind you, I just linked above that a Mac Pro (current) might well have a HD4870.

Disclaimer: I do own a Mac in addition to several PCs.
Depending on which Mac that is. :innocent:
 

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And, naturally, Schumi's problem means that windows can't play games well and osx can right? There can't possibly be any other explanation.
No. Just that Windows has more problems than OSX apparently.

I just disagree with:

1) Mac doesn't have games. This is entirely untrue.

2) Mac can't play games well. Well, they let you update until a HD4870 so I can't really see how this is true.

3) Windows is DA BOAM! <= I absolutely am against the idea of letting Microsoft know they have the monopoly over x86 platform operating system... because such thought let to the mess that is Windows Vista, and is supposedly being remedied by Windows 7.

By no means am I saying a Mac is better than a PC. (my main computer is a PC) But truthfully, it has its own advantages aside from being an easy-to-use platform. :/ Its price isn't right... but I get the feeling PC users turn too much of a blind eye on Mac.

P.S.: And psyhop, all the points above are not to be compared to PC, but rather, to evaluate on exactly how a Mac works.

I do know for a fact that a Mac is expensive. Hands down.

News flash: Dell and HP sell PCs for just about as much.

...so in my opinions, Apple is just like Dell or HP... pretty much. No comparison to Alienware since Apple doesn't look like they want to support such high configurations just yet.
 

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1. The Mac Mini (and the iMac) use PC laptop form-factor parts. That doesn't make them "not PC" parts. I'm not sure if you noticed, but lots of PC laptops are sold. In fact they are currently more popular than desktops.
And more expensive. Might I add.

Of course there are those parts, but they are still considered to belong in the "mobile" section of components rather than desktop components. If we talk about things as broad as being a "personal computer" component, then arguably, Mac is also a personal computer of sort.

That aside, a Mac packaging is sometimes (or maybe all the time) more elegant and compact than a desktop due to them having mobile parts. That's one thing to consider.

Aside from Mac Pros having big cases, your average iMacs are quite compact.

As for EFI, the majority of PC makers simply don't care about it. There's a little interest, in fact my home desktop has UEFI and Vista x64 set up to use it for a while now. But for the compatibility concerns and OS support, there's not a lot of point in changing over from a plain BIOS. Apple could do it because they were in the process of completely changing hardware platforms (for the second time in 10 years) so they went with the "cool new thing". It also was meant to curtail things like OSx86, which of course didn't have much effect.
OSx86 is hacking out support for traditional desktop counterparts of components in Apple for potential support. It does not mean the desktop counterparts are completely supported due to differences in configurations.

Well, yeah, Apple does take advantage on that, but... well, so does Dell or HP against your average users. I think it's just the common issue with enterprises.

Sure. NFSU2 probably can't support four cores, so that's a good part of the problem there. It's relatively common knowledge that a fast dual core is better than a slower quad for gaming. The second point I was going to make here, about lumping every single possible PC and game under one person's particular problem is already covered by another person.
I never had such lagging issues with my Q9450. If it was specifically a quad-core problem then it would have escalated to a patch of some sort. Or disabling cores in BIOS would have helped.

But that's beside the point. I just want to say that Windows gaming is bugged. And if not for you (yeah, you can run Crysis smoothly... I think I've heard that enough), then maybe for someone else.

My Sager laptop uses an 8800M GTX. Apple does not produce a laptop that can compete with it. And Sager's using even faster chips since then. There's also PC laptops with SLI. Not "junk 9400M and mediocre 9600M" hybrid, but true "two 9800M GTXs" SLI. You have to bump a Mac Pro's graphics option up a few (expensive) notches to get that performance, and a PC notebook does it in a portable package.
Yeah... the price is high. I get the idea. Never said otherwise.

But I hope you remember the fact that those are portable desktops you are talking about there. And battery life is terrible on those...

I mean... if you end up having to plug it in all the time when you want to use it, then the novelty of it being a mobile device is kinda lost. :( I like the idea for that it offers high performance for a more compact package, but I don't like how it's not as "mobile" as it should be.

A Macbook or otherwise any other PC laptops/notebooks with configurations lower than those would perform almost similar, but give much better battery life under normal usage. So a Macbook and an average laptop/notebook are more like mobile devices to me.

Those desktop replacements should be called compact desktops rather than notebooks or laptops.

The Mac gaming arena is little, and Macs are well-known to be mediocre gaming rigs. One of the reasons so many Mac games seem to "run well" (when they aren't horrid Cider ports anyway) is because a software developer has a much stronger grasp of the OS and the hardware since on a Mac it's all so limited. Developing for a Mac is closer to developing for a console.
Yes, it's little. But I just want to say that it does exist.
Or actually, it's not that little once you bootcamp Windows.

Edit:

But Phil... what about... the Apple? ;p
 

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In layman's terms, it is. As you have mentioned a few times already, it can run Windows. What about it makes it "not a PC" if it can run Windows?
It's called a Mac rather than a PC. PC is pretty much tied with Windows. Weird... that's the mindset nowadays. Layman? Sure... ask anyone who doesn't know how a computer mouse works, and they'll surely tell you that anything with Windows on it is a PC. Everything else is just either Linux or Mac.

Have we touched component compatibility yet?

"Elegance" is strictly subjective. And for that compactness the user loses expandability, speed (since mobile parts arguably do not perform as well as their desktop counterparts) and their iMac becomes little more than a consumer electronics device. When it gets old, chuck it and get a new one, monitor and all.
Expandability is debatable. Some Mac systems are updatable and do contain server-class components as opposed to desktop-class components. Mac Pro for instance. They do use Xeons in Mac Pro. Also since Mac Pro uses CPU socket, you can also update the CPU to some extend.

Better yet, some Mac Pro have PCI-E 2.0 and you can "try" plugging in a high-end card. Whether it works or not is up to Apple, but seriously, you can do that. Upside? It reduces the price for the same component purchased from Apple... significantly.

So expandability is debatable.

Speed? Same reason as above.

iMac is actually quite a compact package. You might not like it, but like... the rest of the population who can't figure out if that monitor is the computer or that big block is the computer is going to take it up for a decent price.

Truth is Sony and HP are already taking that into account, and they are integrating displays and the rest of the components into one package.

Sad thing is... Apple would have dominated the market a few years back if they priced their components right.

Hear it? See it. YouTube - Crysis Smooth and Maxed
Mind you, the PC in that demo is nine months ago technology.
I played it. 2 years ago. I have tried this game on god knows how many configurations and god knows how many times. You can ask around because I even have benchmarks and pictures of it running at way over 60fps.

Recently tried it on a 4GHz Q9450 system with 4GB of DDR2 RAM (needless to say, all of the sticks clocked to death), and an overclocked HD4870.

But it stutters and hiccups anyway, no matter the configuration. Blame the developers for that.

Actually, ask Phil. I'm probably the one who talked about this game the most in the forums whenever I test it on a new configuration. And you might not believe this, but I tested that game on a lot of OSes, too. XP, Vista, and Server 2008... 32-bit or 64-bit... you name it. The game just works the same on all of them. Not the slightest difference. Slight hiccups and pauses now and then. Cause? Could never find it. Happens on all configurations, so...

Battery life on a Mac Pro or an iMac is not much better. 8P
Mac Pro is a workstation...
iMac is a desktop computer.

But that aside, Macbook Pro's battery life is up to 3 times that of the Sager.

Say... Sager is rated for about 2 to 2 and half hours, right? Macbook Pro is rated for up to 8 hours.

Apple - MacBook Pro - Technical Specifications - All the specs for both 15- and 17-inch MacBook Pro notebooks

Even the Macbook Air lasts for a good 3 to 4 hours.

Just live with it....a Mac is like a real apple, when you first get it, its all nice, delicious and shiny, but one you leave it out for a few hours it will start to brown.......as in all those little annoyances come up and bite you in the ***.
But that's the apple part. :lol:

Anyway, yeah... I can see the decision. iPhone just isn't really... how should I put it? Not exactly "it"? Apple did try to innovate, but it doesn't really work out too well.

Plus fees are insane. :p
 

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I'm saying Crysis would lag and stutter regardless. Not that it can't run smooth. Well, because I did run that friggin' game at over 60fps on high settings... so I really can't say that it can't run smooth.

And you're using a desktop-replacement basically. It's not a laptop.

I just don't get why people buy a "laptop" or "notebook" just so they can put it on their desks. oO

I mean... why bother? Just get a desktop then. For $1000, you can pretty much grab a quad-core computer with like... the latest or semi-latest graphics card, some hefty amount of RAM and yadda, yadda. Then overclock the hell out of the system and enjoy almost stutter-free gaming. (it's smooth but it stutters. Occasionally... because of many factors) My main computer is an extremely underpowered system. Even though I do have on my desk what could be considered a monster in disguise.

(p.s.: Yeah, Phil... I updated it to the point that performance machines bore me... :evil:)
 

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Made short... (sorry)
Sounds good enough. Though I still wonder... why you want to do so much when you're in the navy? I doubt you have the time to finish all NES/SNES/etc... blah... games that you want to play. Lately, I barely find enough time to watch like... maybe a little bit of TV news, and then one movie per week.

I'm mostly on music, though. And maybe the net here because I have mobile network. Fast enough to send mails and stuffs. :p (actually got this just so I can chat with my girlfriend whenever possible)

Rap, it's on you swashbuckling gangster. bring it son. If your not packing at least a GTX285 with a Q9650, then go home:p
I'll reveal it when I'm free enough. Right now I'm knee-deep in coding projects and homeworks for college. :p
 
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