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So what's the best but yet cost effective way to do it?Are there any adapters to do this or I will need a graphics card with a tv out socket?

What is the quality of picture and can I connect any television?

Are there any chipsets (with onboard graphics card)that support this feature?(I heard a long time ago that intel 810E motherboard had a tv out socket).

I wont be able to shell out much money but any help from you people will be highly appreciated.
 

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<B><font color="lightyellow" size = "1">A BIG BAD
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umm, why do you wanna use the TV anyway? i guess for games it would be OK, but those scanlines don't look too good. Anyway, the quality depends somewhat on the encoder/modulator chip used in the card. I dunno if there is a chip that exists that is a GPU and also a modulator. You can connect any type of telivision as long as the TV supports the whatever type of standard the card outputs (i.e. mesecam, secam, pal, ntsc). You can skip this part, i dunno, I'm just in the mood for typing i guess... (not mine.)

In order to work TV receivers require a source of field timing reference signals. These are signals that tell the TV receiver to be ready to receive the next picture in the stream of images. Early set designers decided to use the Mains power supply frequency as this source for two good reasons. The first was that with the older types of power supply, you would get rolling hum bars on the TV picture if the mains supply and power source were not at exactly the same frequency. The second was that the TV studios would have had enormous problems with flicker on their cameras when making programs.

There are two Mains power frequencies widely used arround the World, 50Hz and 60Hz. This immediately divided the worlds TV systems into two distinct camps, the 25 frames per second camp (50Hz) and the 30 frames per second camp (60Hz).

Later the 60Hz camp made a small adjustment and changed the field rate to 59.94Hz when they added color to the signals. The issue of field frequency remained sufficently deep rooted in both TV standards that the vested interest remained long after the original technical justification had gone.

The biggest compatibility problems between TV standards remain related to the field rate; these are also the hardest problems to solve.

Beyond the initial divide between 50 and 60Hz based systems, further sub-divisions have appeared within both camps since the inception of Color broadcasting. The majority of 60Hz based countries use a technique known as NTSC originally developed in the United States by a committee called the National Television Standards Committee. NTSC works perfectly in a video or closed ciruit environment but can exhibit problems of varying hue when used in a broadcast environment.

This hue change problem is caused by shifts in the color sub-carrier phase of the signal. A modified version of NTSC soon appeared which differed mainly in that the sub-carrier phase was reversed on each second line; this is known as PAL, standing for Phase Alternate Lines . PAL has been adopted by a few 60Hz countries, most notably Brazil.

Among the countries based on 50Hz systems, PAL has been the most widely adopted. PAL is not the only color system in widespread use with 50Hz; the French designed a system of their own - primarily for political reasons to protect their domestic manufacturing companies - which is known as SECAM, standing for SEquential Couleur Avec Memoire. SECAM was widely adopted in Eastern Block countries to encourage incompatibility with Western transmissions - again a political motive.

In general, since the field and scan rates are identical, you can expect to get a monochrome picture from a PAL video recording replayed on SECAM equipment, and vice versa.

So there, i've gone totally out of topic and i've managed to hit 10% of your query.:)
 

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<B><font color="lightyellow" size = "1">A BIG BAD
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WTF!! was that!?! hmm, i better get the crazy Xeven back or people will go nuts reading my posts... ehehehe:D :D :D

OK, i'm back...:D :D :p :p :emb: :emb:
 
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woha xeven...you know quite a lot about that stuff!....

I have a geforce2mx with svideo out, so your tv would need an svideo in, or an svideo>scart plug or something (which is what I have)....unfortunately I can't get NTSC (60hz) to work in color so I'm stuck with 50hz only. Works still great though, the combination PAL TV+ePSXe+PAL PSX game works pretty smooth :D
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Nice description Xeven;) .10% ?where?

Ok never mind,just kidding :D .That was a lot of information and most of that I didnt knew.Thanks neway.

Coming to Samor,Thanks to you also.

What would be your personal advice to get the best performance on a television(like what should I do?)If both ntsc and pal works it would be great.
 
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well, i dont know which card has the best tv-out but the one on my geforce2 mx seems ok. I think NTSC would be possible if my tv had an s-video in, but like I said before I'm using a svideo>scart plug instead.
 
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Originally posted by UncleClive
My GeForce2 GTS does TV out, but I am limited to either 640x480 or 800x600 resolution. Even at 640x480 resolution, text is still quite blurry to read - even through the s-video lead. (Didnt NTSC mean Never The Same Colour? :D)
not so weird....did you ever see console video games using those tiny windows fonts?
My advice: pick 640x480....800x600 might be a higher resolution but
A) I think it's not exactly 800x600 but a cropped version
B) except that it's harder to read it doesn't really make a difference on a TV anyways

This also explains the benefits of a tv-out:
A) big ass screen
B) better performance, since you only have to run at 640x480 for a good picture
 

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Then again, you could get the AverKey PC to TV adapters from AverMedia. That's what I use, and the picture quality is really good. It supports resolutions up to 1600x1200, depending on the model. Dang things have been around for 3 years or more :p . The output is Composite video, S-video or RGB video. And you can watch it on your monitor at the same time. And the cheapest model's about US$100.
 

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Discussion Starter #14
Originally posted by EfrainMan
Then again, you could get the AverKey PC to TV adapters from AverMedia. That's what I use, and the picture quality is really good. It supports resolutions up to 1600x1200, depending on the model. Dang things have been around for 3 years or more :p . The output is Composite video, S-video or RGB video. And you can watch it on your monitor at the same time. And the cheapest model's about US$100.
Thanks EfrainMan.That looks like something I was looking for.I Will first check the details and then look for availability and costs here in India.
 

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Discussion Starter #15
That Avermedia stuff looks rather fine for me (atleast what I saw on the site).I am seriously thinking about AVerKey iMicro (since it is really cheap).May even try for medium range one (if its not much costly).

Anyone have more details about its performance ? A word from Someone who already possesses one such pc to tv adapter will surely help a lot.
 

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No prob, dude. Yeah, you should go a little higher than the cheap one. Higher screen res's and the remote. The image quality's probably better, too. Have fun!
 
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