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General of Tangerines
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Discussion Starter #1
I'm new with Red Hat Linux so it's trial and error with this OS system.

How do I install a program in Linux?

I was able to download firefox and it ended with a gz format.

I have extracted the file and how do I install this program?

Do I use RPM?
 

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B( o Y o )BS!
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895 Posts
If it's a .tar.gz file, you can decompres it using:
$ tar -xzvf file.tar.gz

But being a big program like firefox, you should try to get a rpm of it... also, reading manuals helps :p

IIRC, you can isntall a .RPM file using:
$ rpm -i file.rpm
you may need root privileges to install (su root//root console).

and the first things you should do when you don't know how to do something:

$ program --help | less
(up/down to scroll, q to quit :p)

$ man program
 

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Just visiting ^_^
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8,299 Posts
but isn't it that you cannot just install any program unless its has linux compatibility???
 

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if you wanna install firefox, all the major firefox builds have a i686-linux-gtk2+xft-installer.tar.gz version. with that all you have to do is extract it into a directory and run ./firefox-installer....

not too many linux programs have a comfy installer like this. Mostly your stuck with either a precompiled bin archive (which most of the time doesn't work) or a source archive. The standard for source building is usually this:

./configure
make
make install

but make sure you read the readmes for any extra commands you may need to run, and to check for the dependencies.

Also choosing a OS with a constantly updated software repository can save the hassle of even doing this...but RPM files are limited to what is already created.
 

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Canadian Spaceman
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Where in hell do you install programs oO I tried to install firefox to my home dir and it wouldnt save any of my settings. :\
 

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Reichfuher said:
Where in hell do you install programs oO I tried to install firefox to my home dir and it wouldnt save any of my settings. :\
if the program uses a make script to compile, then it installs into /usr/local/ by default. you can change it by specifying --prefix=/whatever when you run ./configure

as for configurations, most configurations are store in your /home/yourusername folder. They are hidden, so either enable hidden items in KDE or GNOME, or remove the period in front of the hidden folder's name

also it is a good practice to keep all your sources in one folder. In case if you want to uninstall something, you an just run make uninstall ;)
 

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General of Tangerines
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Discussion Starter #7
I baffled now.

When I extracted the filesm there was a folder called firefox-installer.

There was a file called firefox-installer.

The firefox-installer installed the program in my home directory.

So how do I get this program on my menu bar?
 

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RZetlin said:
So how do I get this program on my menu bar?
you don't (ah the wounders of linux and doing everything manually ^_^)

in your terminal, type in ./mozillafirefox (or something similar to that....I don't remember the actual name) if you want, you can set up a shortcut in KDE or Gnome
 

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Knowledge is the solution
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what id recommend you is to go to sites like www.freshrpms.net for getting all your initial programs needs, while you get more familiar with linux. RPM's are the equivalent of a self installer for windows, which is a great help when you are starting... just don't get too dependant on it :p

Also, when you get a little more experienced you should try apt-get or yum... talking about apt does anyone knows of a good graphical interface for it?
 

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Some general infos for the newbies: .tar.gz (or .tgz) files are comparable to .zip files, so you "install" them by unpacking; in case of source, you need additional steps (usually configure; make; make install). Typically, you have to add the programs installed that way manually to the menu. On the other hand, .rpm (or .deb on debian based distros) are software installation packages that (in theory) handle everything themself, like checking dependences, choosing the right installation directory, installing help files, updating the menu.
 
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