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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Since I'm a cheapskate and they won't release the PSP outside of the stupid value pack(They are charging an extra $50 for crappy headphones and a tiny memory card), I'm thinking about getting a used PSP. How can you tell if it has dead pixels?
 

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You can't tell unless you turn it on. And I doubt the shop would wnat to let you check before you bought it 'as-is' :p. It's easy enough to tell just by lookin at it. If it doesn't bug you, don't worry about it...it might have 100 dead pixels, but so long as you don't notice it, its all good.
 

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I bought a used Gamecube from EB Games when I lived in Florida and they had a 14-day return policy. There is a video game store near me called Rhino Games and hopefully they have some sort of return policy like EB Games does. Even if it's only a 7-day policy, I'll be happy.
 

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Well...maybe you will luck out or purchase from a place that will allow returns. If you strike out we suggest using Google for a handy MPEG4 video used to stress LCD displays and may help withdead pixels. The author designed it with PSP in mind
 

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I bought a used Gamecube from EB Games when I lived in Florida and they had a 14-day return policy. There is a video game store near me called Rhino Games and hopefully they have some sort of return policy like EB Games does. Even if it's only a 7-day policy, I'll be happy.
Dead pixels aren't typically included in standard warranties, and the terms for replacement usually aren't so simple. Every company has a different policy for replacement: some will replace a screen/product no matter what. When I bought my Alienware laptop, their policy was that I would have to check it against an image and depending upon where the dead pixel was situated (toward the center region of the screen) would determine if they would replace it or not (pretty ridiculous for an expensive laptop if you ask me, but most companies seem to have crooked policies now days concerning LCDs).

Really it comes down to the same rules as always: read the damn warranty and know what you're agreeing to. If it's a used product, ask first. This way if the seller misrepresents the condition then that becomes you defense (for example, places like ebay and amazon will refund people cheated in this manner).

Defective pixels come in two flavors: hot pixels and dead pixels. Hot pixels are permanently white, and remain so as long as the device is powered. Dead pixels fail to display any information, and so they'll appear black.

Supposedly, a screen can be lightly massaged on the troubled area and may sometimes be fixed. But in all the products I've ever purchased, I have never had a defective pixel and so I've never verified this. Naturally, you probably risk breaking the device or making things worse.
 

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I've listened through those headphones, and they're actually quite good. And Sony Memory Sticks are expensive, so it might be better to use the one that comes in the Value Pack -- plus, there's the whole official support thing.
 
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