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Next month I am going to the local US Embasy for an interview for Permenant Residence in the US (Read. Residence mot Citzenship), I don't really want to leave Malaysia but my father has been waiting for this for 12 years, the only thing better there is the social security system there, some people I know who went there came back saying there isn't really much there.

I want to ask a few questions, do most Americans understand the Metric (meters,celcius) system? and do most of you understand British English (saying lift instead of elavators and diffrent way to saying z)? as well as can I bring and use my region free PS2 (modified) or DVD player (stock) in the US?
 

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Well i'm not american, but my sister goes there all the time on business trips. I also know many people in the US, so I can pretty much answer your question ;)

Many Americans understand Celcius and other forms of metric units. As for 'British English' as you call it i'm not completely sure abouit that, but in Canada we sure do ;) So I don't think the States differs that much. You can definately bring your PS2 and DVD player to the States, as for using it, that may be a different story.
 

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Some Scottish Guy
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Americans use American English. They have different terminology (such as you mentioned for elevator) but really they'll understand you when you say "tap" instead of "faucet."

And due to the Metric Conversion Act of 1975, most Americans should understand that system.

Americans use NTSC for TV systems and Region 1 for DVDs. Region free stuff should work.

Don't ask me a lot though, with me being Scottish and all. Personally i hope to emigrate to Canada one day (better country, more personal space (lol)). I wish you well with your interview.
 

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Old Man
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Americans normally use feet, miles, pounds, etc. The metric system is used mostly by scientists and industrial folk. If you speak in metric, don't expect many of us to be able to do the proper conversions. Also, as far as grammar, most americans can understand both the british and american way of saying things. After being here a little bit, you'll learn our linguo.

As for your PS2 thing, as long as it is capable of running on ~110~120V, you'll be fine. Region Free stuff will work, as long as its NTSC, or your TV supports both PAL and NTSC. (On the disc, it'll say if its NTSC or PAL, or what region. IE: NTSC U/C)

You'll do fine here.
 

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Americans are familiar with the CONCEPT of metric numbers - we learn and use them in school, and use them almost exclusively in math and science classes - BUT most Americans have no frame of reference when it comes to actually using metric numbers. Meaning, if it's a hot day, if you said "Damn, it must be 100 degrees!", everyone would understand that you're exclaiming just how hot it is, but if you said the same thing with a corresponding Celsius number, no one would know. Same goes for distance... people think in terms of feet and miles, so if you say meters or kilometers, most people won't really get a mental picture of the distance in question.

As for british terminology, just about everyone will understand what you're saying, especially in context. Some people may laugh at the terminology though, so you're better off using American terms if you can remember to do so.
 

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yeah if you have the urge to say "flat" for a living space say "apartment" instead...and say "bathroom" instead of "lou" or "lew" (is that spelled right?).

Rhombus said:
...Same goes for distance... people think in terms of feet and miles, so if you say meters or kilometers, most people won't really get a mental picture of the distance in question...
well american ambiguity of the difference between miles and kilometers isnt so vehement as the difference between farenheit and celcius.
 

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which part of the u.s you coming to? Cause if you go to like..the Southern "dixie" region, I don't think the question will be whether they'll be able to understand you, but will you be able to understand them oO
 

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Wind, Life, Eternity
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Player-X said:
some people I know who went there came back saying there isn't really much there.
Do they happen to be young and able bodies? :evil:
I'm thinking about leaving US :p (might happen this summer!) The systems here are so unfair! :rant: It saddens me to see the old citizens who worked their whole lives getting barely enough to get by after retirement, but sickly foreigners (with lots of money outside of US) who just come here are getting $1000+ a month to "help" their livings (inside a big house?)... not to mention all the "benefits" that goes to many "recreation" homes for elderly foreigners (which costs about $80/day/person I heard) to let them play mahjong :???: So that's where the money goes...
Of course, the preceding paragraph is very biased, feel free to ignore me :p

About the metric system, most people know it anyway because science and math classes are required in highschool :p
I never know any British people, but I think Harry Potter is in British... right? :heh:
 

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Just visiting ^_^
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well one thing that I can say, as long as you can play US PS2 cds in your PS2, then you can definitely bring it to the US. Although, you cannot bring burned audio cds and teh likes since it might be confiscated by the customs at the airport.
 

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Wind, Life, Eternity
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I think they can't tell the differences by looking at them, so it should be fine :p
By the way, I saw lots of people listening to burned CDs in airports... although it is possible to get fined or something.
 

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Premium Member
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Just don't download any music while you're there :p
 

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An old lady.
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Relax, you'll like it here. Just use the phrase "f/u/ckin' A" a lot and you'll fit in just fine. ;)

The US is a big country, where are you going to be residing?
 

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that's cool, the same state I'm in

California isn't bad, what do you mean "unfortunately"

anyways, yeah, you'll have no problem understanding what ppl out here say, and I'm positive they'll understand what you say

hell I memmer once a brit. asked me for directions :p
 

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heh heh, if anything, if you're coming from a foreign country and you're looking for some tolerance and open mindedness, you've chosen the correct state :p
 

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Coffee Demon
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Indeed..California is tolerant....at times a bit too tolerant.
There is a nice Malaysian community in the Bay Area..chances are you would fit right in.. (Bay Area is a melting pot of European and Asian cultures). Hope during your visit folks give you the right impression...Oh and don't grade Cali / US by the folks in San Fran..Some of those people are in a class all by themselves
 
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