Next Generation Emulation banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
band
Joined
·
4,912 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i recently was cleaning my room and came across and old english assignment paper where i was to find some english slang words's definisions. "english" as in british english. i found a lot of them ( there were like...50 of them or smthn) but i missed out on 3 which to this day still i havent found on google.

can someone please fill me in?

-tits-up
-trog
-luv

@[email protected]

thanks
 

·
ゲート オーペン!
Joined
·
911 Posts
D.D. said:
i recently was cleaning my room and came across and old english assignment paper where i was to find some english slang words's definisions. "english" as in british english. i found a lot of them ( there were like...50 of them or smthn) but i missed out on 3 which to this day still i havent found on google.

can someone please fill me in?

-tits-up
-trog
-luv

@[email protected]

thanks
I dont think is luv it should be wuv which is love .... Ithink
 

·
Premium Member
bsnes, ePSXe
Joined
·
21,979 Posts
luv is what british people say to their significant others, and women say it to random people (like, "'ey luv")

tits up is like "belly up" i assume, meaning dead or like out of business.

trog i have no idea.
 

·
PCSX2ベータテスター
Joined
·
1,457 Posts
trog means "worthless" in many different american comics and cartoons and is very insulting. i know there's an episode of Teen Titans where StarFire is called a trog and Stitch in Lilo and Stitch is also called trog by gantu if that helps?

edit: the american comics aside i found the british version
http://whu.teamhighgrove.com/britishslang.html

trog - ugly girl
 

·
Retired
Joined
·
8,882 Posts
This reminds me of that scene in Austin Powers: Goldmember where Austin and his father are speaking in "English english", and you can't understand a word of what they say (the subtitles all apear as "????"). Maybe the british audience could get it, though :p
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,583 Posts
Boltzmann said:
This reminds me of that scene in Austin Powers: Goldmember where Austin and his father are speaking in "English english", and you can't understand a word of what they say (the subtitles all apear as "????"). Maybe the british audience could get it, though :p
It's kinda true when you turn the situation around as well. There's a lot of people from the UK that don't understand American slang. I can recall several conversations with Betamax where I'd space off and use some American term so he wasn't sure what I was saying.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,303 Posts
>tits-up

All gone Pete Tong
usage: "Yeah, I was installing Splinter Cell 3, but it went tits up. Sodding Starforce 3"

>trog

Either someone who is fugly, or a trogladyte:
    1. A member of a fabulous or prehistoric race of people that lived in caves, dens, or holes.
    2. A person considered to be reclusive, reactionary, out of date, or brutish.
    1. An anthropoid ape, such as a gorilla or chimpanzee.
    2. An animal that lives underground, as an ant or a worm.
>luv

Right.... it's shorthand for 'love' used in text messaging of all kinds
It's also often used as the written form of 'love' in sentances such as:
''s alright luv, I'll make some rosie lee'. You could equate it to the -chan suffix in jap in a way.
 

·
band
Joined
·
4,912 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 ·

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,303 Posts
Oh dear......
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,303 Posts
*** is also a term for dogsbody in boarding schools.
 

·
Heh...
Joined
·
1,905 Posts
Kane said:
*** is also a term for dogsbody in boarding schools.
I seriously don't know what you just said. ***?

BTW, I said before " British, look it up." Am I using that right? Can I use the word "British" to mean the language of English when referring to what is obviously spoken in England?

nvm I looked it up in the dictionary. I guess you can.
 

·
Premium Member
Joined
·
26,303 Posts
f-a-g is censored here for some reason. Probably some 12 year old using it in a derogetory form

English slang isn't British. It's cockney, or geordie, or scottish or welsh, etc. Each area of the UK has it's own dialect, from the west coun'ry to pompey and so on.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top