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Discussion Starter #1
I record my videos in MPEG2 which results in a pretty large file. To conserve HD space I was going to dum the video format down into FLV format. I was wondering, if I were to go back to the video in which I converted to FLV and edit it in a movie program such as Adobe Premiere and save the movie in FLV Widescreen format again, how much quality would be taken away.
 

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x.264 man. x.264.

Otherwise, Xvid
 

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Discussion Starter #3
x.264 man. x.264.

Otherwise, Xvid
Okay so what your saying is to save in x.264 when I first encode because I usually use FLV for uploading to youtube when I finish my premiere movies which goes in my favor for the high quality option and widescreen capability.
 

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No sir, I don't like it.
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You won't lose too much if you keep the bitrate close to or higher than the originally captured video. If you perform any kind of postprocessing though, (cropping, resizing, spacial/temporal smoothing, etc.) you will stand to lose a lot of quality. FLV is a very lossy format and only recommended for use when your video is edited to the point of completion and you plan on streaming the video.

H.264 (MPEG4 AVC) is an excellent codec, but requires a very powerful processor to encode with low bitrate/high quality settings. (perhaps the only real exception being Nero's H.264 implementation) Not to mention, x264, the only VFW codec worth anything, is no longer in active development. Support has been dropped in favor of the CLI version.

Xvid (MPEG4 ASP) is a very mature codec and many processors can easily do real-time single pass video capture with this. Head over to Koepi's website and download the "VAQ" version. This version also supports multicore.:thumb:
 

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Discussion Starter #5
You won't lose too much if you keep the bitrate close to or higher than the originally captured video. If you perform any kind of postprocessing though, (cropping, resizing, spacial/temporal smoothing, etc.) you will stand to lose a lot of quality. FLV is a very lossy format and only recommended for use when your video is edited to the point of completion and you plan on streaming the video.

H.264 (MPEG4 AVC) is an excellent codec, but requires a very powerful processor to encode with low bitrate/high quality settings. (perhaps the only real exception being Nero's H.264 implementation) Not to mention, x264, the only VFW codec worth anything, is no longer in active development. Support has been dropped in favor of the CLI version.

Xvid (MPEG4 ASP) is a very mature codec and many processors can easily do real-time single pass video capture with this. Head over to Koepi's website and download the "VAQ" version. This version also supports multicore.:thumb:
Oh alright good to know thanks! :thumb:

Yeah, for my vids I might add some voice commentary and a few lower thirds titles but nothing too major like cropping
 

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Discussion Starter #6
Also, I was wondering, what would be the best bitrate I should be around to maintain the high quality of my vids?
 

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No sir, I don't like it.
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That's going to depend upon the codec, its settings, and your capture resolution. For Xvid, I'd recommend 1.5Mbits/sec or higher and turn off B-frames. This is assuming that you are using a capture resolution of 720x480.

You may be thinking that 1.5Mbits/sec is kinda' high, but most capture devices capture in MPEG2 @ 6Mbits/sec or higher. Using a lossless codec like Huffyuv is ideal, but it produces enormous files. Though since we're trying to conserve HDD space...
 
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