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The one and only
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey i was just wodnering how i would check power supply on my pc. Im planning on getting a new geforce 7800 and i doubt i have enough power on my stock supply from dell.
 

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KO'ed User
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I ain't sure about this stuff but i think there should be an option in the bios of your pc setting up the voltage. It has to be precise as too much will cause something to blow, and too low will make your pc run slow. In the end, i think it depends on the motherbord. And, can u just look at the adapter?
 

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The one and only
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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ok i checked and it said i have 375w. Anyways, if i buy a new one, how easy is it to install? and do i have to change settings on it? or will it adjust automoatticaly
 

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Some Scottish Guy
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PSU's are easy to install. Just plug it into every device in a neat order, connect it to case and plug it in. It "adjusts" automatically.

Make sure you get a good PSU though. With a 7800 card you're pretty much looking at a 500w. I'd check out Seasonic's PSUs. Every review I've read so far puts them as one of the best manufacturers.
 

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Mr. Stupendous
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and of course make sure its compatible. nobody yet has mentioned that dell dont like standards and most of their pc lines you non-standard wired atx plugs and psu.

plug a normal atx into that pc and it could go out with a very loud bang;)
 

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The one and only
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Discussion Starter · #7 · (Edited)

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War Games coder
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I'd also like to know why they started making 24-pin power supplies. My new mobo has a 24-pin connector, which my 20-pin power supply fits into... I'm not sure I should power it on that way, and I have no idea how to find an appropriate power supply for it as nobody advertises a 24-pin connector (it has to go by another name of some sort).
 

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PCSX2 Coder
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KillerShots said:
I'd also like to know why they started making 24-pin power supplies. My new mobo has a 24-pin connector, which my 20-pin power supply fits into... I'm not sure I should power it on that way, and I have no idea how to find an appropriate power supply for it as nobody advertises a 24-pin connector (it has to go by another name of some sort).
that isnt advised, altho you can get a 20-pin to 24-pin adaptor which will work for you, but i would suggest upgrading the power supply. The reason for the change i believe is the power requirements for PCI Express are different to exising ones.

makotech222: by "normal atx" i think hes referring to older versions of motherboards with AGP and PCI slots. But you are correct to be looking at atx v2.0 power supplies, just remember dont get one too cheap with high wattages, its more than likely it will suck badly.

here in england i look at spending £50-70 on a 500watt, which works out roughly $90-120. Altho having said that, if you look at the AMP's in the detailed spec, they are actually pretty good. It's recommended you have 24amps or more on the 12v rail, that has 34v, so it should be pleanty.
 

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War Games coder
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Ok, so what sort of supply should I look for? Like I say, I don't see anyone advertising a 24-pin power supply, so what term should I find?

Unfortunately, I have already purchased a new power supply (before I even got the motherboard) because I decided that 400W wasn't enough for a dual 7800 GTX 512 system... went with a 600W. (EDIT: No, I won't have both at once... my little bro ordered a single 7800 GTX 512, and I'll eventually SLI the thing when the price is reasonable). I'm still waiting for the video to arrive in the mail so I haven't powered anything up... in fact, I haven't even looked at the new power supply yet, so it may fit fine (it does mention having a PCI-express connector). If need be, I may put it up on e-bay and find a more suitable supply... though I thought I did well with that one.
 

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PCSX2 Coder
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as long as it is ATX 2.0 compatable, you should be fine, it should at least have the 20pin connector, plus 2 4-pin connectors, one being to fill the gap and one to go in the usual extra 12v power socket, which should all be labeled up.

This is also a good thing because your graphics card will require a 6-pin PCI-E power connection (looks king of like the 4-pin ones), but you should be fine.
 

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The one and only
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phew thanks. About installing the hardwae, i think i should have someone from bestbuy to do it for me, because powersupply seems to complex for me.

oh and on the reviews, it says i have to buy an adapter if i have a 24 pin. I have a 24 pin, right? lol

WOWWWWW i checked with geeksquads site, it says it will cost $180 to have them install just the video card! LMAO thats insane.... So ive reconsidered, i need to learn how to install a power supply now :) i think i can do the video card myself. Anyone have a guide for power supplies?
 

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PCSX2 Coder
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you need to learn how to read rules as well, double posting is against them, nevermind treble posting!

also google is your friend
 

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Next time you buy a PSU keep these facts in mind:

+12V line is used to power all the motors of your computer.

Examples are: the CD spindle, the floppy spindle, all the fan coolers, the harddisk motor, and so on. Also, this line is being recently used to power the DC-DC converters which in turn feed the CPU. So it's very important to have good amperage in that line. If you have two hard drives (or are planning to have two in the future), or have a CD-RW plus a CD-ROM, you must have a strong +12v line (minimum 15A) in your PSU.

+3.3V line is used to power on RAM, expansion cards and so on. Just remember that the Video card is... you guessed, an expansion card. Some cards don't operate in 3.3v, but the motherboard will derive the voltage needed by the video card from the 3.3V line. So it's also important to have very good Amp numbers in that line.

+5V line. This line is used to power the logic circuits of all the drives of your system. That includes floppy, CD-rom, CD-RW, DVD-rw, hard disk, motherboard circuits and more. Some motherboards use that line to supply the DC-DC converter to the CPU instead of the 12V line, but that isn't common today.

+5V SB This is the "standby" line. It powers part of your PC even if it's turned off. The only way to remove that voltage is to unplug the PC. If you want to prepare your PC to be turned on from the keyboard, or you want it turned on at a certain time of the day by itself, you must have at least 2A on that line. Most ATX PSU die just because the ·standby" line blows out.

-12V and -5V lines aren't very critical because they are used to power only the serial and parallel ports of the motherboard.
 

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The one and only
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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
yes sorry about the triple post. And about google, id rather have you guys send me to a site before i go to google. i trust you guys to give me a better guide.


Edit: one question. how do i know if my PSU is 20, or 24 pin? i dont want to have to buy an adapter for it.
 
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