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Opensource-spice
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, basically my question is one of use.

About five months ago I tried running a ubuntu parition side-by-side with my Vista x64 partition. I liked it fine but a few things kind of... escaped me.

1. DVD/.avi Video playback tearing
2. Mounting and ripping DVD images
3. Making windows partitions automatically mount so I don't have to reload my music collection every time I wanted to play it.

4. In order to install "A" you must have "B", and in order to install "B" you must have "C" and in order to install "C" you must have "D"... you get the point.

I've seen a lot of praise over Debian. I like the name. I like the style and I'm really starting to like their support and community. I like the fact that Ubuntu was originally based off of it. It might still be; I don't know. Also, back then I had a very limited download cap. Now it is unlimited and I really don't give two ****s if I download 20gigs to get what I want or 30.

So, as you can see I'm still interested in Linux because of the free, open source philosophy and the fast use. I really only intended to use my Windows partition to play games but I always found myself going back to it just for ease.

What's in your head about all of this, ngemu?
 

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band
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5,270 Posts
Not going to claim to be a Linux guru, but it is sort of in the field that I work in, so I'll try to pretend to be a socks-and-sandals guy.

Anyways, I don't know about 1 because I don't play DVDs or avis at work. That said, I seem to recall that in Ubuntu you need to install a CODEC through the software application manager that allows you to play it. You may need to edit the repository list for the software manager to be able to make it available. Try looking here for more advice on how to proceed, as I believe it is in the grey legal area : https://help.ubuntu.com/community/RestrictedFormats

As for DVD Image I don't know how I can help there because I haven't encountered issues, not that there aren't any.

To mount your Windows/ntfs partition automatically, you'll need to edit your etc/fstab. You need to find out where the partition is mounted (in the terminal, execute sudo fdisk -l). After that, you'll need to insert the following line in your /etc/fstab. Do this by executing sudo gedit /etc/fstab and adding this line to the bottom.

<location of ntfs partition> /media/windows ntfs-fuse auto,gid=1002,umask=0002 0 0

If you have any questions or my advice isn't clear, don't hesitate to ask.
 

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Registered
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251 Posts
been a while since i used ubuntu.

video playback shouldn't be a problem, just install vlc player, or install the gstreamer from the repositories (don't remember if you had to add the medibuntu repositories for the win32 codecs)

there should be various software for ripping images, and you can use the mount command to mount the images. you can read the manual page in ubuntu (man mount) or search the net for the command.

as said above you can edit the etc/fstab to automount your windows drive
 

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Registered Anime Hater
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Well I installed Ubuntu on a VM just a week or so ago, and this is what I find really annoying:

1) First of all, I wanted to increase the screen resolution from the ugly default of 640x480, but there's no simple option to do that. I Googled it, and found out that you had to edit the code in some xorg file as told here:

HOWTO: change resolution/refresh rate in Xorg [Archive] - Ubuntu Forums

This might not take a while after I get used to it, but.....come on! I have to type commands just to change the blasted screen resolution? No thanks, I'm much better off with XP by right-clicking my desktop and adjusting the slider!

2) Lack of sufficient ATI driver support for Ubuntu, or any Linux distro for that matter.

3) Ubuntu help is utter crap. Some geeky programmer's written it in language which he himself might find simplified, but which just goes over my head! I know there's Ubuntu Forums where you can easily get help, but having an instant help and support area within the OS isn't a shabby idea either.

4) Installation of programs is painstaking: Although I have seen that easy installers are now coming into existence in Linux, but there's still some improvement needed before I double-click on a file and hit "Next" blindly till everything's done.


They say Ubuntu is "Linux for human beings" and I admit that it is certainly much more user-friendly then its predecessors, but its still nowhere near (yes, I'll have to say this) even Windows 95 in terms of user-friendliness! And definitely ages away from XP/Vista/Win7! Still has A LOT of work to do before your average computer newb can start using it.
 

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Registered
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251 Posts
Well I installed Ubuntu on a VM just a week or so ago, and this is what I find really annoying:

1) First of all, I wanted to increase the screen resolution from the ugly default of 640x480, but there's no simple option to do that. I Googled it, and found out that you had to edit the code in some xorg file as told here:

HOWTO: change resolution/refresh rate in Xorg [Archive] - Ubuntu Forums

This might not take a while after I get used to it, but...come on! I have to type commands just to change the blasted screen resolution? No thanks, I'm much better off right-clicking my desktop and adjusting the slider!

2) Lack of sufficient ATI driver support for Ubuntu, or any Linux distro for that matter.

3) Ubuntu help is utter crap. Some geeky programmer's written it in language which he himself might find simplified, but which just goes over my head! I know there's Ubuntu Forums where you can easily get help, but having an instant help and support area within the OS isn't a shabby idea either.


They say Ubuntu is "Linux for human beings" and I admit that it is certainly much more user-friendly then its predecessors, but its still nowhere near (yes, I'll have to say this) even Windows 95 in terms of user-friendliness! And definitely ages away from XP/Vista/Win7! Still has A LOT of work to do before your average computer newb can start using it.
1. last time i used ubuntu in vmware i just had to install the vmware tools, and i could change the resoultion just fine, i think it worked fine in virtualbox as well but it is a while ago since i tried so that may have changed.

2. as for ati drivers, they seem to work fine for me just activate them in the restricted drivers utility.

3. if you need help, there's many options you can read the manual for the different commands, if you use the terminal. you can get support for most of your problems in the ubuntuforums and most questions have already been answered. you can also ask for help in the irc channel.


sure as a new os you have to familiarise yourself with the new way the os works, and you may have to learn some terminal commands, but mostly after that it is a decent os, it mostly depends on preference. though it is not without problems, some hardware doesn't work or is poorly supported, but most newish computer should work fine. it is mostly when you want to do something advanced such as setting up a web server or edit some config files it starts to get somewhat confusing.
 

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Registered Anime Hater
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15,801 Posts
Well I'm using VirtualBox, and it says that the resolution can only be increased from within the OS itself, I also want to increase the color quality from 16-bit to 32-bit (well I haven't researched how to do that so I can't say whether its easy or not).

Anyway, I deleted the VM :p I just did it for curiosity, I really don't need Ubuntu right now, maybe some other time :)
 
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