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· The Vodka Theme
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
i'm looking for a site with exercises in assembler. we don't have a book :???: in my school and there is no place where i can get extra practice.
i would also like you to recommend me with a compiler (preferebley a one that works without going into dos) in school i use tasmb so maybe you can offer me a better one?
 

· Transcended
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1,421 Posts
A compiler that works w/o having to go to DOS? *Shudder*

But seriously, if you're still a beginner, I think you need to be damn comfortable with DOS, unless you like calling Win32 APIs to debug your code, or you use a debugger to trace the code.

The Art of Assembly is a monster of a book, but I think it has some exercises in it, but it's primarily a reference book, so if you were looking for just exercises, then it's not for you.

I can probably give you some exercises, but most would involve low level manipulation, such as video, disk, file, TSRs (wtf!) etc... using old fashioned interrupts. If you're looking for Win32 tasks, then I can't help you.

EDIT: I browsed the site Xzyx987X linked and it's pretty OK. It even has Floating Points! :)
 

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Personally, I really disslike The Art of Assembly. It wastes so much of your time with high level stuff that the author just stuck to make learning assembly "easier"... In my opinion assembly is the easiest to learn if you learn the various aspects of low level programming (registers, the stack, interrupts, etc.) as you learn the mnemonics to which they apply (preferably in some sort of logical order). It may be slow going at first, but I think you'll find that once the pieces start to fall into place that assembly really isn't so hard after all.
 

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NASM is probably the best assembler you could use, unlike TASM and MASM it's still be updated and works on Linux, Windows and i think Mac. While its not yet complete I'd keep an eye no the Assembler Wikibook here. Good luck, assembler is fun and extremely enlightening. :thumb:
 

· War Games coder
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1,927 Posts
If it works on mac, it only is likely to work on the (as yet unreleased) x86 versions of the mac. Otherwise, it would have to be a different assembly language as it's on a different architecture.

As far as assembling for DOS... why? The newer Windows OS's are quickly dropping all support for DOS-anything. I'd think if you wanted to jump into assembly, grab something that can do so under Windows or Unix. As long as you're not trying to do priveleged instructions, nothing should get in the way of that... and if you are, maybe you should re-think what you're doing.
 

· Transcended
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1,421 Posts
Zenogais wasn't kidding. It's extremely enlightening. Especially when you do C and pointers galore.

Btw, there's a TSR that you can use as a handy reference (that uses old DOS based hypertext technology). you can easily look up definitions and Interrupt numbers, descriptions, usage. I'll post them when I remember the names.
 

· Narcissist
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725 Posts
On the old NEC computers I grew up with, the assembler came built in (mon). It was fun trying to translate the Z80 code I read in magazines to make it work on mine.

Of course, now I just snap my fingers and my brother does the donkey work.

Edit: Usborne published a few assembly language books for schoolkids, they're pretty basic but serve as a good introduction to the totally new. Might be able to find a few of those lying around for real cheap. Like <$1.
 
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