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Starting to get old now and so like alot of people with mid life-crises's, i'm really starting to get rid of alot of junk. I'm still a die-hard gamer, but PC is all i really want with just my PS4 being the one console i'll also keep for any game that i really like but was one of the unlucky console-only titles and can't get on an emulator. Just one problem... Crimson Skies High Road To Revenge is a game i absolutely love and really want to keep in my collection.but, as everyone of you know, it was only released on the 3 generations of Xbox consoles to have come out over the years. I do also have a 360 and have it on there in my digital downloads and it works fine... but tbh none of my other games in my Xbox download list i really care about and having a whole console just for one game? Maybe if i was 15 still but not anymore when i'm now just starting to get grays :( Surely this game is playable (like as in perfect) on some emulator in 2020 given how we have PS2 emulators that run perfect. Anyone know?

My specs (incase needed)

Operating System : Windows 10 Home x64
SSD : Samsung 960 Evo M.2 250GB NVMe
Motherboard : ASRock Z390 Pro4
CPU : i5-9400F @ 2.9GHz
GPU : Gigabyte GTX1060 G1 Gaming
RAM : 16GB (DDR4)
Power Supply : Thermaltake Toughpower GX1 600W 80+ Gold
 

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It is progressing slowly, you can run some commercial games but it is best to try it yourself and see the results...

BUT I must ask why compare ps2 emulator progress to xbox? They are clearly completely different system in almost every way, they have different devs working each emulator and pretty much everything else is different.

It is 2020 and massive progress is being done on PS3 and Nintendo Switch emulator.

For XBOX Original, it maybe good next year or next ten years who knows, if you have seen what is in the original XBOX hardware and for somewhat reason Microsoft did to control the hardware then you will realise it is much, much more complex than you think hence why so few devs work on it, when work on the emulators for this system pretty much halted for a couple of years and just over the past year it finally making massive progress and seeing commercial games running, some terribly but some very well.

If you want to know Crimson Skies works yet, just search in youtube and try to find a recent video of someone trying it on a emulator for real world indication of it working or not.
 

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It is progressing slowly, you can run some commercial games but it is best to try it yourself and see the results...

BUT I must ask why compare ps2 emulator progress to xbox? They are clearly completely different system in almost every way, they have different devs working each emulator and pretty much everything else is different.

It is 2020 and massive progress is being done on PS3 and Nintendo Switch emulator.

For XBOX Original, it maybe good next year or next ten years who knows, if you have seen what is in the original XBOX hardware and for somewhat reason Microsoft did to control the hardware then you will realise it is much, much more complex than you think hence why so few devs work on it, when work on the emulators for this system pretty much halted for a couple of years and just over the past year it finally making massive progress and seeing commercial games running, some terribly but some very well.

If you want to know Crimson Skies works yet, just search in youtube and try to find a recent video of someone trying it on a emulator for real world indication of it working or not.
"BUT I must ask why compare ps2 emulator progress to xbox? They are clearly completely different system in almost every way, they have different devs working each emulator and pretty much everything else is different."

I'll be honest with you... I'm not tech savvy... like at all :( Thanks for the reply, hopefully get there soon.
 

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Sorry but I am getting tired of the same old questions and especially ones that complain the systems are old and should have an emulator for android.

A little research you can find out it is much more complex problem than just time, it takes devs and research.
 

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I've been following the discussion here for probably well over ten years, now I'd like to contribute some to this discussion. Just a few questions, trying to get an idea of how all this works. So you take apart an Xbox and parts that are unique to the system can be broken down and examined and reconstructed digitally. So though I am aware this is half of the problem, I think, is the issue here the breaking down or the reconstructing digitally. In other words, if you had a blueprint of the console, would it be difficult to transition to the digital/ to emulate?

Then the question arises, okay, if you need a blueprint what limits are you facing just examing the hardware itself?


So okay, we have the hardware emulated so the second half of the problem is the operating systems that use the hardware? Clearly, we could just use the OS from the Xbox which I think one dev did. Is that what BIOS is? Are there, other than ethical and legal complications, major difficulties in lifting the OS from the system? Before you hang me, I'm discussing this purely from an academic standpoint. This is for educational purposes only.

Lastly, would it be practical to teach an AI to construct the language from the hardware, assuming the hardware emulated was indistinguishable? Stated otherwise, perhaps without emphasizing my complete lack of knowledge on the subject, how could AI learning tech be utilized to aid in the development of an emulator?
 

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I've been following the discussion here for probably well over ten years, now I'd like to contribute some to this discussion. Just a few questions, trying to get an idea of how all this works. So you take apart an Xbox and parts that are unique to the system can be broken down and examined and reconstructed digitally. So though I am aware this is half of the problem, I think, is the issue here the breaking down or the reconstructing digitally. In other words, if you had a blueprint of the console, would it be difficult to transition to the digital/ to emulate?

Then the question arises, okay, if you need a blueprint what limits are you facing just examing the hardware itself?


So okay, we have the hardware emulated so the second half of the problem is the operating systems that use the hardware? Clearly, we could just use the OS from the Xbox which I think one dev did. Is that what BIOS is? Are there, other than ethical and legal complications, major difficulties in lifting the OS from the system? Before you hang me, I'm discussing this purely from an academic standpoint. This is for educational purposes only.

Lastly, would it be practical to teach an AI to construct the language from the hardware, assuming the hardware emulated was indistinguishable? Stated otherwise, perhaps without emphasizing my complete lack of knowledge on the subject, how could AI learning tech be utilized to aid in the development of an emulator?
1/ Learning the hardware is hard as it uses undocumented chips, processors and such, reverse engineering requires expensive electronic tools and then trying to understand why the hardware works that way. It is a very difficult and painstsaking process that will take allot of time, imagining to do this on something like Sega Saturn.... Well that will be crazy.

Reverse engineering hardware is useful for devs on hardware they do not understand on specific hardware and why it can break games and when you fix those particular games it breaks others as in what they did for PS2 and it took the guy 6 months for one specific hardware.

2/ Software is difficult and requires reverse engineering now as just using the code made by the manufacturer will sue you pants of. Do not forget games use encryption.

From what I read long time ago original xbox uses lots and lots more instruction sets and libraries than windows so converting them while keeping the games run optimal at current hardware is difficult.

3/ AI is not an available solution, I mean it will help optimise the code but reverse engineering hardware and software and convert to current hardware and OS, AI do not miracously find a solution, it does so by making tons of mistakes until it gives a desired result, considering the hardware and softwware is different to anything else it will take allot processing and time so unless you got AI processing like used uni research, it will take a long time and even then will take doing it over and over as it wont give desired result until you figure out how to explain what the desired result in code.

Above all else all you have mentioned including AI requires one very important thing, man power with the time and knowledge. Not anyone can reverse engineer hardware and or software and have both of that knowledge and yet have that kind of knowledge plus work on AI, well that is rare.

Work is being done it just takes time and hope more people work on such projects but what is happenning of late is the devs are getting jobs and have little time to work on emulators, what is disheartining is the end user with toxic demands like it has been a year is the emulator done now, why isn't there android port and such... Now you can reach devs on discord and seeing that day after day the same questions when it will be done when it is done makes it harder and harder for devs to continue their work when this is a as this is their passion project and just let them do what they want to do, I mean with their experience and knowledge, they would know how to progess in their work.
 

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Thanks for your quick reply. Enlightening. The why should come in terms of cost vs. efficiency. And examining the 360 to see where upgrades were made and other parts abandoned. Then, I would look to the list of games that are backward compatible with the 360. This helps isolate, perhaps, games that are incompatible with the hardware. I would imagine, though, that this wouldn't be the case, as any hardware more sophisticated should be able to emulate older hardware. I'd say asking the question of why they were not able to dev general backward compatibility would likely yet be a rewarding question to ask. Too bad there isn't trace software we would run that would map the circuitry, that we could run on the console through an exploit.
 
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