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I was wondering whether it wouldn't be possible to emulate the xbox using a hypervisor, e.g. KVM. The only difficulty thing would be to implement the 'hardware drivers' (especially the NV2A might be tricky, maybe the findings of the nouveau project could help, just going the other way round)
Theoretically, performance shouldn't be a problem on modern hardware with this approach.
 

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I was wondering whether it wouldn't be possible to emulate the xbox using a hypervisor, e.g. KVM. The only difficulty thing would be to implement the 'hardware drivers' (especially the NV2A might be tricky, maybe the findings of the nouveau project could help, just going the other way round)
Theoretically, performance shouldn't be a problem on modern hardware with this approach.
I'm looking into QEmu's x86 emulation code as we speak. IIRC it uses virtualization, but it not a complete solution for emulating Xbox. The Xbox's timing frequency is different than a PCs (but that may not be a problem) and there are some instructions that can't be virtualized. Although I'm sure that's what Xeon used to emulate the CPU. This has been asked before multiple times, but it's worth a try. As for performance, it's really too early to tell. PC emulators only emulate the CPU, Ram, HDD, VGA card and a Soundblaster 16, etc. But none of them emulate any advanced hardware such as a full-blown GPU such as the NV2A which can render at peak performance 125,000,000 primitives per frame, an APU supporting 256 "voices" and 64 3D "voices" as well as 32 hardware submixers and programmable DSP effects, and other things. Because all that has to be emulated in software, that's still going to take some serious horse power.

As for the NV2A's documentation, there's a guy on xbox-scene.com who calls himself "openxdkman" who successfully documented a large part of the NV2A's registers (which are highly similar to the NV20 from nouveau which is where he learned most of his information). There are some custom registers too, but so far, it doesn't appear to be that many. What no one realizes is that sound is going to be the hardest part. The AC97 and the Motorola 56300 is well documented, but the NVIDIA SoundStorm APU is not (unless you can find me an open source NForce 2 driver).

That's the way I see it. I'm not trying to brag or anything, but I'm one of the few people here who actually understands how Xbox works on the deepest hardware levels. Hope this sheds some light for you.
 
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